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Thread: Aviation

  1. #351
    joS3ph Guest
    English is the common ATC language, but the ICAO only mandates English ATC where there is sufficient international traffic.

  2. #352
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    OK Joe, What kind of plane do you personally own? A Piper 3? G5? P-38, 737?
    I loved seeing your mailbox but I noticed you cut the picture off where you have
    your hanger and control tower.
    It really would be great if you were the one building the 747 house or lived in one (like "The Magician" before your time I guess or Austin Powers).
    You ever get any photos from the Northern lights? I heard you can see them from NYC the past couple of days due to a massive solar storm a couple of days ago.
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
    R.I.P Kim: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...336317&df=all&
    R.I.P Dad http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=93315851
    R.I.P Mom http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=97780420

  3. #353
    joS3ph Guest
    I own a Gulfstream G550. (I wish!). Actually, I own a 1979 Piper PA28R-201T Turbo Arrow IV.

    I have some pictures of the Aurora Borealis somewhere. I always burn all of my photos to DVD, but I always FAIL to make an index so I know what is on each DVD. Imagine that!
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-12-2011 at 11:21 AM.

  4. #354
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    http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/photo/000374.html

    This is the type of plane our leader Joe has
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
    R.I.P Kim: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...336317&df=all&
    R.I.P Dad http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=93315851
    R.I.P Mom http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=97780420

  5. #355
    joS3ph Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysucks View Post
    http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/photo/000374.html

    This is the type of plane our leader Joe has
    Except mine has a T-tail.

  6. #356
    DonnaMc Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysucks View Post
    http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/photo/000374.html

    This is the type of plane our leader Joe has
    Wow. I want a ride!

  7. #357
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysucks View Post
    I loved seeing your mailbox but I noticed you cut the picture off where you have
    your hanger and control tower.
    joS3ph's waiting for Travolta to put his house up for sale.


  8. #358
    joS3ph Guest
    You better watch what you wish for DonnaMc! Seems as if we live within 10-12 miles of each other. My plane is located at Charles Baker Airport near Woodstock, TN.

  9. #359
    DonnaMc Guest
    [quote=Barbossa;1121363]joS3ph's waiting for Travolta to put his house up for sale.

    quote] Is that really Travolta's house? With airplanes in the driveways, who could ask for more?

  10. #360
    DonnaMc Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Barbossa View Post
    joS3ph's waiting for Travolta to put his house up for sale.

    Is that really Travolta's house? With airplanes in the driveway - who needs anything else?

  11. #361
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barbossa View Post
    joS3ph's waiting for Travolta to put his house up for sale.


    I saw a special on the community in Fla where Travolta lives. It was started by a lady pilot wasn't it?
    If I remember right they don't like Travolta flying his 707 I think because the runway isn't really designed for a plane of that size.
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
    R.I.P Kim: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...336317&df=all&
    R.I.P Dad http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=93315851
    R.I.P Mom http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=97780420

  12. 03-12-2011, 12:34 PM

  13. #362
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysucks View Post
    I saw a special on the community in Fla where Travolta lives. It was started by a lady pilot wasn't it?
    If I remember right they don't like Travolta flying his 707 I think because the runway isn't really designed for a plane of that size.
    I couldn't afford the gas required to taxi that 707 to the runway!

  14. #363
    joS3ph Guest
    Wow, what a place!

    This is what my 1979 Piper P28R-201T looks like:


  15. #364
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    I want!!!!! Although I would be like Kristie Alley's character in "Look Who's Talking"
    "OH MY GOD!!"
    "WHAT IS IT?????"
    "just kidding. Here put your hand on my stick,"
    "I AM NOT putting my hand on your stick!"
    "C'mon help me fly the plane,"
    "Ok" (puts hand on stick)
    "OMG! BABY!"
    Everyone must die but not everyone has lived


  16. #365
    joS3ph Guest
    PA28R-201T Arrow IV Avionics and Instrumentation

    Several people have sent me private messages inquiring as to the type of avionics and instrumentation installed on my Piper PA28R-201T Arrow IV. Presently, my PA28R-201T is equipped with the following modernized avionics/IFR instrumentation:

    Garmin GNS 530 WAAS NAV/COM GPS, Garmin GMA 340 Audio Panel with Music Interface, Garmin 330 TXP with TIS (Traffic Information System), Century III Three-Axis Autopilot with Electric Trim, VS, Altitude Hold, Couplers to Heading/NAV Source (ILS, VOR and LNAV, VNAV, LPV GPS Approaches), S-TEC Altitude Preselect and Alerter, S-TEC GPSS 801 Unit (GPS Steering), King KCS 55A HSI & Slaved Compass System, King VOR w/ Glidescope, King KN 64 DME, King KX-155 NAV/COM, Encoding Altimeter, JPI EDM-700 Engine Monitor with Fuel Flow Totalizer, Horizon Digital Tachometer, Davtron MB-800 Dual Digital Yoke Computers, Standby Vacuum Pump and Garmin 396 Backup GPS with Weather.

    PA28R-201T Data/Performance


    The Piper PA28R-201T (turbocharged) was offered in 1976. It featured a new, longer tapered wing span and increased maximum takeoff weight. The PA28RT-201/-20T Arrow IV introduced a new, "all moving" T-tail. Production of the Arrow IV ceased in 1982, and resumed again in 1989, but ceased once more in 1992. Instead, Piper returned to conventional-tailed Arrow III production. Very small numbers were built in the early 1990s while Piper was under bankruptcy protection. Since the emergence of New Piper, Incorporated in 1995, the Arrow III has been part of the expanded Piper line-up, although only small numbers have been built.

    The PA28R-201T Arrow IV is equipped with one, 200-horsepower (150 kilowatts) Continental TSIO-360-FB, fuel injected/turbocharged power plant. Maximum speed is 178 knots (330 kilometers/hour), maximum cruising speed is 172 knots (320 kilometers/hour) and long range cruising speed is 153 knots (284 kilometers/hour). Initial rate of climb is 940 feet/minute. Range with reserves is 900 nautical miles (1,667 kilometers). Empty weight is 1,732 pounds (786 kilograms) and maximum takeoff weight is 2,900 pounds (1,315 kilograms). Stall speed (dirty) is 55 knots (102 kilometers/hour). Service ceiling is 16,200 feet (4,938 meters). Fuel capacity is 72 gallons (273 liters).

    Takeoff ground roll is 1,025 feet (312 meters). Takeoff over 50 foot obstacle is 1,600 feet (488 meters). Landing ground roll is is 615 feet (187 meters). Landing over a 50 foot obstacle 1,525 feet (465 meters).

    Dimensions: Wing span 35 feet, 5 inches (10.80 meters), length 27 feet, 3 inches (8.33 meters), height 8 feet, 3 inches (2.52 meters), and wing area is 170 square feet (15.9 meters squared).
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-12-2011 at 05:07 PM.

  17. #366
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    WOW it's pressurized huh?
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
    R.I.P Kim: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...336317&df=all&
    R.I.P Dad http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=93315851
    R.I.P Mom http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=97780420

  18. 03-12-2011, 08:06 PM

  19. #367
    joS3ph Guest
    I received my BSAE (Bachelors of Science/Aerospace Engineering) from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (Daytona Beech). Has anyone else here attended Embry-Riddle or does anyone else here have an aviation-related degree?

  20. 03-12-2011, 08:19 PM

  21. #368
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    Here is a picture of my airplane. I just use it for shopping trips and such. Just a tiny bit over powered.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    John Trim On Face Book
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    It is strange that so many people choose to be stupid.


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  22. #369
    DonnaMc Guest
    Hey John, you have one just like mine!

  23. #370
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    Hi Joseph,

    What a fabulous Piper...definitely sounds as though you have it oufitted with the best of everything...I'm sure all of us in this forum can see you at the controls of that Gulfstream G550 too!

    At your convenience, would you be so kind to explain a bit about about airport size and if there is a maximum of arrivals/departures allowed per day based upon their facilities? The upcoming NCAA Final Four games will bring an enormous number of vistors to town, many of whom will be flying in on private aircraft. Local news just aired a segment stating that Hobby Airport (HOU), will be accommodating up to 1000 smaller aircraft, and another smaller airport (no commercial traffic), expects to have approximately 500 arrivals/departures per day, up from their average 200 or so. Where would Hobby put all of the planes that will be here for a few days? Does it mean that they would temporarily close down a runway in order to make room for them? Would this have any effect on their capability to handle commercial traffic or are most airports equipped to handle this type of situation? Thanks again for your time- I really appreciate you answering our questions and sharing your knowledge with us...I am truly enjoying this thread and the opportunity to learn more about aviation.
    Last edited by Cynful; 03-12-2011 at 09:09 PM.

  24. #371
    joS3ph Guest
    Jersey:

    The Piper PA28R-201T Arrow IV is an unpressurized aircraft. What we need to concern ourselves with at this point is "service ceiling," "maximum operating altitude," and "absolute ceiling."

    "Service ceiling" is the maximum altitude where a 100 feet per minute (fpm) climb can be maintained. Above the service ceiling, you should still be able to climb, but climb performance will be less than 100 feet per minute.

    "Maximum operating altitude" (MOA) is exactly that (altitude up to which operation is allowed, as limited by flight, structural, powerplant, functional or equipment characteristics). "Service ceiling" and "maximum operating altitude" are theoretical of course, as there are many factors that would determine the actual values.

    "Absolute ceiling" is the highest altitude the airplane can reach, period...in other words, you're hanging on at Vy with a zero fpm rate of climb. Maximum operating altitude is usally not the same number...MOA is more of an equipment limitation than a performance limitation. "Absolute Altitude" is your another way of saying "above ground level" (AGL), and that is not relevant to this discussion.

    In regards to pressurization, a pilot is required to use supplementary oxygen whenever the aircraft is above 12,500 feet for 30 minutes or more. The pilot is also required to use oxygen continuously for any portion of a flight above 14,000 feet. Everyone on the aircraft must use oxygen above 15,000 feet.

  25. #372
    joS3ph Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by John Trim View Post
    Here is a picture of my airplane. I just use it for shopping trips and such. Just a tiny bit over powered.
    John Trim:

    The image you posted reminds me of the massive General Electric GE90-110B1L turbofans that provide thrust for our Boeing 777-FS2(LRF) freighters.



    FedEx Boeing 777-FS2(LRF) N854FD departing Anchorage, Alaska, 18 October 2010.

    -----


    FedEx Boeing 777-FS2(LRF) N856FD arriving Everett, Washington (delivery flight), 04 August 2010.

    -----


    New General Electric GE90-series turbofan prior to installation.

    -----


    Boeing 777 Upper Panel.

    -----


    Boeing 777 Cockpit

    -----

    GE90-110B1L Turbofan: General Data and Dimensions


    The General Electric GE90-110B1L turbofan is an axial flow, twin-shaft, high-bypass engine (power plant). It is rated at a whopping 110,100 lbf (489.3 kN).

    Fan Diameter: 128.000 inches
    Overall Diameter: 135.000 inches
    Overall Length: 287.000 inches

    Aircraft/Engine Prices (2010):

    Boeing 777-FS2(LRF): $269.1 million (USD)
    General Electric GE90-Series Engine (Each): $26 million (USD)
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-13-2011 at 01:49 AM.

  26. #373
    joS3ph Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by cdolen View Post
    Hi Joseph,

    At your convenience, would you be so kind to explain a bit about about airport size and if there is a maximum of arrivals/departures allowed per day based upon their facilities?
    Cdolen:

    This is going to be a rather lengthy, so I am going to divide this explanation into two parts: part one and part two.

    Airport Capacity and Facilities, Part I

    The efficient movement of aircraft and passengers between airports is highly dependent on two key characteristics of an airport’s operations: the demand for service by aircraft operators and passengers and the capacity at the airport (both in airspace and the local environment). A major concern of airport management is the adequacy of an airport’s airfield, specifically in relation to the layout of the airport’s runways, to handle the anticipated demand of aircraft operations. If air traffic demand exceeds airport or airspace capacity, delays will occur, causing expense to air carriers, inconvenience to passengers, and increased workload for the air traffic control system as well as airport employees.

    There are actually two commonly used definitions to describe airport capacity: throughput capacity and practical capacity. Throughput capacity is defined as the ultimate rate at which aircraft operations may be handled without regard to any small delays that might occur as a result of imperfections in operations or small random events that might occur. Throughput capacity, for example, does not take into account the small probability that an aircraft will take longer than necessary to takeoff, or a runway must close for a very short period of time because of the presence of small debris. Throughput capacity is truly the theoretical definition of capacity and is the basis for airport capacity planning.

    Practical capacity is understood as the number of operations that may be accommodated over time with no more than a nominal amount of delay, usually expressed in terms of maximum acceptable average delay. Such minimal delays may be a result of two aircraft scheduled to operate at the same time, despite the fact that only one runway is available for use, or because an aircraft must wait a short time to allow ground vehicles to cross.

    The capacity of an airfield is not constant. Capacity varies considerably based on a number of considerations, including the utilization of runways, the type of aircraft operating (known as fleet mix), the percentage of takeoff and landing operations being performed, ambient climatic conditions, and Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) which prescribe the use of runways based on these considerations. When a specific number is given for airfield capacity at an airport, it is usually an average number based either on some assumed range of conditions or on one specific set of conditions.

    The physical characteristics and layout of runways, taxiways, and aprons, for example, are basic determinants of the ability to accommodate various types of aircraft and the rate at which they can be handled. Also important is the type of equipment, particularly the presence of instrument landing systems, installed on the airfield as a whole or on a particular segment.

    One of the characteristics that affects an airport’s capacity is the configuration of its runway system. Although every airport is different, the configurations of airport runways may be placed in the following categories: single runway, parallel runways, open-V runways, and intersecting runways. Although every runway configuration has a uniquely different capacity that is determined by a variety of factors, the FAA has established some basic estimates of capacity by runway configuration.

    The single runway, for example, the simplest of runway configurations, can accommodate up to 99 operations per hour for smaller aircraft and approximately 60 operations per hour for larger commercial aircraft operating under visual flight rules (VFR). Under poor weather conditions, when aircraft fly according to instrument flight rules (IFR), the capacity of a single runway configuration is reduced to between 42 and 53 operations per hour, depending primarily on the size of the aircraft using the runway and the navigational aids that are available.

    Another significant factor in determining airport capacity is the consideration of the volume of demand and characteristics of the aircraft that wish to use the airport during any given period of time. For any given level of demand, the varying types of aircraft with respect to speed, size, flight characteristics, and even pilot proficiency will in part determine the rate at which they can perform operations. In addition, the distribution of arrivals and departures to the extent to which they are bunched rather than uniformly spaced, as well as the sequence of such operations, also play a part in determining an airport’s operating capacity. In part, the tendency of traffic to peak in volume at certain times is a function of the flight schedules of commercial air carriers using an airport. For example, at airports that serve as hubs for major air carriers, high volumes of aircraft all arrive in banks and all depart a short time later, after passengers have transferred from one flight to another to complete their travel. Arrival banks of aircraft result in one level of airport capacity, whereas departure banks result in another level of capacity, merely by the different operating characteristics of aircraft arrivals and departures.

    Estimating the capacity of an airfield is a challenging one. Significant investments are made on the part of airport management, the FAA, and air carriers to estimate (as accurately as possible) the capacity of an airfield under varying conditions and operating characteristics. However, if the basic fundamentals of aircraft operations are understood, initial estimates of airport/runway capacity may be established with little effort.

    The FAA categorizes the wide variety of aircraft types by their maximum certified takeoff weights (MTOW). Aircraft with MTOW less than 41,000 pounds are considered category A/B (or small aircraft), aircraft with MTOW between 41,000 and 255,000 pounds are considered category C (or large aircraft), and aircraft with MTOW greater than 255,000 pounds are considered category D (or heavy aircraft). For the purposes of estimating runway capacity, an airport’s fleet mix is defined by the percentage of small, large, and heavy aircraft that perform takeoff and/or landing operations over a given period of time on the runway.
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-13-2011 at 08:00 AM.

  27. #374
    joS3ph Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by cdolen View Post
    Hi Joseph,

    At your convenience, would you be so kind to explain a bit about about airport size and if there is a maximum of arrivals/departures allowed per day based upon their facilities?
    Airport Capacity and Facilities, Part II

    In regards to capacity at Hobby (HOU), several administrative management approaches are being adopted to manage demand. Among these are required diversion of some traffic to reliever airports, more balanced use of metropolitan air carrier airports, restriction of airport access by aircraft type or use, establishment of quotas (either on the number of operations or on passenger enplanements), and “rehubbing” or redistributing transfer traffic from busy airports to underused airports. Perhaps other airports in the area can absorb some of the demand.

    The vast majority of airports are small and suited only for general aviation (GA) aircraft, but in some cases there is also an underutilized commercial service airport.The best regionwide solution to the problem of delay might be to divert some traffic away from the busy airport to either a general aviation reliever airport or a lightly used commercial airport.When delays become intolerable at the busy airport, users begin to divert of their own accord. Even though those who choose to move to a less crowded facility do so for their own benefit, they also reduce somewhat delays incurred by users that continue to operate at the crowded airport.To be attractive to a broad spectrum of GA users, a reliever airport should be equipped with instrument approaches and provide runways capable of handling the larger, more sophisticated GA aircraft. In addition, users need facilities for aircraft servicing, repair, storage and maintenance, as well as suitable ground access to the metropolitan area. Not all GA aircraft can make use of reliever airports. Some might be delivering passengers or freight to connect with commercial flights at the air carrier airport. Others might be large business jets that require the longer runways of a major airport. Most local airport authorities, however, do not operate their own GA relievers. Some large airport authorities plan and coordinate activities with nearby reliever airports operated by other municipalities or private individuals.

    Airplane Storage

    In regards to temporary storage of a large number of airplanes, where space is at a premium, airplanes will be stored as close as possible to each other (read "sardines"), wherever space exists. The events of 11 September 2001 proved that a very LARGE number of airplanes could be parked in a relatively small area.



    "Grounded" airplanes taken at Halifax on 11 September 2001


    Another image of "Grounded" airplanes taken at Halifax on 11 September 2001
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-13-2011 at 09:00 AM.

  28. #375
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    What amazing photos. I knew the planes were grounded, but had no idea what they looked like.
    Everyone must die but not everyone has lived


  29. #376
    DonnaMc Guest
    Great pic of the grounded planes!

  30. #377
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    Amazing 9-11 pics WOW
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
    R.I.P Kim: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...336317&df=all&
    R.I.P Dad http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=93315851
    R.I.P Mom http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=97780420

  31. #378
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    There's an bump on a thread for one of my favorite actors Danny Kaye.
    Here's something I just learned about Danny Kaye that fits in perfectly with this thread.

    Like many in the film business, Danny was an aviation enthusiast. He became seriously interested in learning how to fly in 1959. When Kaye went for his first written pilot's exam, he brought a liverwurst sandwich in case he was there for hours. The first plane Kaye owned was a Piper Aztec.[48][49] Kaye got his first license as a private pilot of multi-engine aircraft, not getting certified for operating a single engine plane until six years later.[48] A vice-president of Learjet, Kaye owned and operated a Learjet 24.[48] He supported many flying projects. In 1968, he was Honorary Chairman of the Las Vegas International Exposition of Flight, a major show that utilized most facets of the city’s entertainment industry while presenting a major air show. The operational show chairman was well-known aviation figure, Lynn Garrison. He was an accomplished pilot, rated for airplanes ranging from single engine light aircraft to multi-engine jets.[13] Kaye held a commercial pilot's license and had flown every type of aircraft except military planes.[48][5][50] Kaye flew his own plane to 65 cities in five days on a mission designed to help UNICEF.[5]
    Danny Kaye was very fond of the legendary arranger Vic Schoen. Schoen had arranged for him on White Christmas, The Court Jester, and albums and concerts with the Andrews Sisters. In the 1960s Vic Schoen was working on a show in Las Vegas with Shirley Temple. He was injured in a car accident. When Danny Kaye heard about the accident, he immediately flew his own plane to McCarran Airport to pick up Schoen and bring him back to Los Angeles to guarantee the best medical attention.


    I just think it was so cool he was a VP at Learjet.
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
    R.I.P Kim: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...336317&df=all&
    R.I.P Dad http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=93315851
    R.I.P Mom http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=97780420

  32. #379
    Crazy Cat Lady Guest
    What a great thread! I had never thought about where they put all those planes, either----awesome photos.

  33. #380
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    love this thread. What is weird about me is i love the concept of flying, I like playing vid games that i fly choppers or planes, love going to airports and watching planes take off and land..but in rl, I am terrified of flying. IT SUCKS!! I am missing out on so much. The take-off makes me go insane with fright. Once I know we are almost landing, I calm down just a bit till we actually land lol. I've tried reading etc to try and get over it. Anyone have any ideas?
    Last edited by PiggyTx; 03-13-2011 at 05:14 PM.

  34. #381
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    Thank you so much Joseph for the outstanding explanation and photos regarding my questions. Your time is most appreciated!

  35. #382
    joS3ph Guest
    You are most welcome Cdolen. When I decided to start this thread, I wasn't sure how it was going to work out. Thanks for making this thread a success everyone!

  36. #383
    jaylene Guest
    Amazing pics of the grounded planes. Such a sad day. Thanks for
    sharing.

  37. #384
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    Quote Originally Posted by joS3ph View Post
    Airport Capacity and Facilities, Part II

    In regards to capacity at Hobby (HOU), several administrative management approaches are being adopted to manage demand. Among these are required diversion of some traffic to reliever airports, more balanced use of metropolitan air carrier airports, restriction of airport access by aircraft type or use, establishment of quotas (either on the number of operations or on passenger enplanements), and â??rehubbingâ? or redistributing transfer traffic from busy airports to underused airports. Perhaps other airports in the area can absorb some of the demand.

    The vast majority of airports are small and suited only for general aviation (GA) aircraft, but in some cases there is also an underutilized commercial service airport.The best regionwide solution to the problem of delay might be to divert some traffic away from the busy airport to either a general aviation reliever airport or a lightly used commercial airport.When delays become intolerable at the busy airport, users begin to divert of their own accord. Even though those who choose to move to a less crowded facility do so for their own benefit, they also reduce somewhat delays incurred by users that continue to operate at the crowded airport.To be attractive to a broad spectrum of GA users, a reliever airport should be equipped with instrument approaches and provide runways capable of handling the larger, more sophisticated GA aircraft. In addition, users need facilities for aircraft servicing, repair, storage and maintenance, as well as suitable ground access to the metropolitan area. Not all GA aircraft can make use of reliever airports. Some might be delivering passengers or freight to connect with commercial flights at the air carrier airport. Others might be large business jets that require the longer runways of a major airport. Most local airport authorities, however, do not operate their own GA relievers. Some large airport authorities plan and coordinate activities with nearby reliever airports operated by other municipalities or private individuals.

    Airplane Storage

    In regards to temporary storage of a large number of airplanes, where space is at a premium, airplanes will be stored as close as possible to each other (read "sardines"), wherever space exists. The events of 11 September 2001 proved that a very LARGE number of airplanes could be parked in a relatively small area.



    "Grounded" airplanes taken at Halifax on 11 September 2001


    Another image of "Grounded" airplanes taken at Halifax on 11 September 2001


    Joe, these pics bring up a great question. It's obvious you were flying on 9-11.
    Where from? to? and what airport was the closest to you when you had to land?
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
    R.I.P Kim: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...336317&df=all&
    R.I.P Dad http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=93315851
    R.I.P Mom http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=97780420

  38. #385
    joS3ph Guest
    PiggyTx:

    Here are a couple of thoughts in regards to flying:

    Know what to expect. Without knowing what to expect on board the airplane itself, your mind tends to wander. Familiarize yourself with the sights and sounds of flying. Understand the bumps and movements of an airplane both on the ground and in the air. Get an idea of what flying is actually like beforehand. This will help you form a realistic notion of what youâ??re experiencing during takeoff/landing or when the plane hits turbulence. Talk to friends who have flown. Ask them to describe the process from start to finish. Question them about turbulence. Do they have a â??bad turbulenceâ? story? Chances are they do, then realize it is simply THEIR story!

    Understand why flying is actually safe. We have all heard the saying: â??Youâ??re more likely to die in a car accident on the way to the airport than on the plane." This is certainly true! Statistics show you are in fact 500-1000 times more likely to meet your demise on the highway. But letâ??s face it; this does not really help calm your fears. Not being in control causes many people problems. But consider this: How many drivers are actually in control of what other drivers are doing on the highway...none! Iâ??m fairly confident that 40,000 + Americans are not dying each year in a car wreck because they have control over the situation. Then consider the fact that since 1970, there have been only 58 fatal events between 16 different U.S. and Canadian airlines. That is an estimated total of approximately 36.6 fatal events (at least one person died) per 16 million flights.Granted, crunching these numbers still may not alleviate your fear of flying, but, it should give you hope that your chances of getting to your destination on a plane are pretty darn good.

    Sit over the wings if possible! Getting yourself onto the plane is only half the battle. You still have to deal with your nerves acting up while you are in your seat. The cool air vent above your head in most commercial airplanes is a great way to chill out and relax. Open the air vent fully and direct it onto your face. The rush of air will not only help calm your heavy breathing, but will also keep your body a bit dryer. (You want to minimize the amount of sweat you will have to wear for the next few hours).


    If the idea of turbulence is your nemesis, grab a seat situated OVER the wings on the plane. While the jury is still out on this one, there is a general consensus that sitting over the wing structure of an airplane will provide the most stability. Itâ??s possible, the turbulence you will feel in the back of the plane isnâ??t going to be significantly worse than in the middle. Still, if you think of the plane like a teeter-totter or seesaw (with the wings as the pivot in the middle), it makes sense that you would feel less bumpiness sitting in the center. It certainly works for some people.


    If you have any questions in regards to flying, or if there is something that really scares you, please let me know and maybe we can work through it.

  39. #386
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    Quote Originally Posted by joS3ph View Post
    I received my BSAE (Bachelors of Science/Aerospace Engineering) from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (Daytona Beech). Has anyone else here attended Embry-Riddle or does anyone else here have an aviation-related degree?
    I haven't attended Embry-Riddle in Daytona, but my father has. He was there in the 50's, right after he got out of the Army. I've seen Embry-Riddle and went around there for a day or so, but no, not as a student. When we were there, a BAD storm had just come through and did major damage to several planes and a few buildings.

    Wish I had an aviation degree, but mine is in the medical field.

  40. #387
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    Here's a post that might help you all that have the chance to listen in on ATC frequencies. These mostly apply to airports that deal mostly with general aviation, or GA aircraft (Cessnas, Pipers - all smaller planes).

    If you have the chance to listen in, you'll undoubtedly hear transmissions such as "Tower this is november three one two romeo golf turning on base leg approach." Lots of numbers and words appearing out of nowhere. Well, let me explain a little of what this means.

    Take our fictional aircraft above. When calling in to tower, an aircraft must identify itself by it's registration number, or "N" number, which is usually prominently displayed on the tail section. In the above case, this plane's N number would be N312RG. Instead of using letters, words are used to avoid confusion from sound alike terms. Therefore, the ICAO (international civil aviation organization) has adopted an "alphabet", to keep the letters uniform to avoid confusion. Below is how these letters (and some numbers) are translated into words:

    A - Alpha
    B - Bravo
    C - Charlie
    D - Delta
    E - Echo
    F - Foxtrot
    G - Golf
    H - Hotel
    I - India
    J - Juliet
    K - Kilo
    L - Lima
    M - Mike
    N - November
    O - Oscar
    P - Papa
    Q - Quebec
    R - Romeo
    S - Sierra
    T - Tango
    U - Uniform
    V - Victor
    W - Whiskey
    X - Xray
    Y - Yankee
    Z - Zulu

    Notice that these words representing letters are fairly short, and none of them sound remotely similar to another. This takes out some confusion out of the equation.

    Numbers are mostly the same with the exception of the number 9, which is pronounced "Nin-er". Why? Because when one is listening to transmissions which are usually fired off in rapid sequence to keep the frequency open, the numbers "5" and "9" sound very similar. In order to avoid confusion, "Nine-er" is substituted for "9".

    So why is a plane's "N" number used to identify an aircraft? GA flights are not assigned flight numbers as commercial aviation flights are identified by an airline designator, followed by a flight number, such as "American 395 climb and maintain 10,000 feet." GA flights are identified by their "N" number every time they fly.

    When first calling in to tower to request services, a GA plane will call in with their full "N" number. For example, our fictional N312RG would call in with "November three one two romeo golf." Sometimes the tower in turn may shorten the number to "one two romeo golf" for brevity throughout their communications with this particular flight. However, on another flight ATC may designate them with another number, such as "two romeo golf" - always a variation of the N number which does not change.

    Hopefully this post is somewhat informative, and if anyone needs clarification, please feel free to ask.

  41. #388
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    joS3ph:
    Thank you very much for responding to my fear of flying. I have gotten better about the thinking of turbulence, but still, I trip out when it happens. lol. But I'm working on that. I don't know how to describe what I feel when we take off, but I will try. When we take off, it feels as if, there's not enough power, like it's slow mo, I guess I want to feel the power of the space shuttle taking off or something. I know that's weird. I have tried taking drugs, meaning xanax from doctor, but, I really don't like it cuz I"m a zombie for a couple days after that. Anywhoo, once again, ty for writing back and I know I will fly again...I just wish I could be like you and my other friends to where, its no big deal etc etc. I mean get this, lol, a whole week before I know I have to fly, I can't eat and get the runs. (I know, gross). thanks again.

  42. #389
    joS3ph Guest
    I am currently in the process of establishing a new aviation discussion forum. The name of this new phpBB forum will be Glass Cockpit. I am in the process of setting up this forum, so at present, there are no messages or topics for discussion.

    Subject matter will be civil (commercial/general) and military aviation. Topics will include such categories as aircraft/rotorcraft, aircraft/rotorcraft accidents and incidents, aviation mysteries, aviation Q&A, avionics, equipment, Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs), flight, flight maneuvers, history, pilot licensing, operations, procedures and technical discussions.

    If anyone is interested, you may register at your convenience. User information will be protected via AES 256 encryption. Your privacy is assured between Glass Cockpit and FAD. I hope the discussion forums will be operational by midweek. Those of you who register will be notified when the board is operational.

    To access this discussion forum, please register at the following URL:

    http://glasscockpit.46.forumer.com/

    Please Note: My participation in various discussions here at FAD will NOT be affected by my newly established forum. I will remain an active FAD member and my activities here will not be lessened by the formation of my new forum.

    Airline employees, flight crew members, ground crew members, pilots (all ratings) and aviation enthusiasts are welcome. Actually, any member of FAD is welcome to join my forum.

    Thanks!
    Joseph

  43. #390
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    Quote Originally Posted by joS3ph View Post
    PiggyTx:

    Here are a couple of thoughts in regards to flying:

    Know what to expect. Without knowing what to expect on board the airplane itself, your mind tends to wander. Familiarize yourself with the sights and sounds of flying. Understand the bumps and movements of an airplane both on the ground and in the air. Get an idea of what flying is actually like beforehand. This will help you form a realistic notion of what you’re experiencing during takeoff/landing or when the plane hits turbulence. Talk to friends who have flown. Ask them to describe the process from start to finish. Question them about turbulence. Do they have a “bad turbulence” story? Chances are they do, then realize it is simply THEIR story!

    Understand why flying is actually safe. We have all heard the saying: “You’re more likely to die in a car accident on the way to the airport than on the plane." This is certainly true! Statistics show you are in fact 500-1000 times more likely to meet your demise on the highway. But let’s face it; this does not really help calm your fears. Not being in control causes many people problems. But consider this: How many drivers are actually in control of what other drivers are doing on the highway...none! I’m fairly confident that 40,000 + Americans are not dying each year in a car wreck because they have control over the situation. Then consider the fact that since 1970, there have been only 58 fatal events between 16 different U.S. and Canadian airlines. That is an estimated total of approximately 36.6 fatal events (at least one person died) per 16 million flights.Granted, crunching these numbers still may not alleviate your fear of flying, but, it should give you hope that your chances of getting to your destination on a plane are pretty darn good.

    Sit over the wings if possible! Getting yourself onto the plane is only half the battle. You still have to deal with your nerves acting up while you are in your seat. The cool air vent above your head in most commercial airplanes is a great way to chill out and relax. Open the air vent fully and direct it onto your face. The rush of air will not only help calm your heavy breathing, but will also keep your body a bit dryer. (You want to minimize the amount of sweat you will have to wear for the next few hours).


    If the idea of turbulence is your nemesis, grab a seat situated OVER the wings on the plane. While the jury is still out on this one, there is a general consensus that sitting over the wing structure of an airplane will provide the most stability. It’s possible, the turbulence you will feel in the back of the plane isn’t going to be significantly worse than in the middle. Still, if you think of the plane like a teeter-totter or seesaw (with the wings as the pivot in the middle), it makes sense that you would feel less bumpiness sitting in the center. It certainly works for some people.


    If you have any questions in regards to flying, or if there is something that really scares you, please let me know and maybe we can work through it.
    Hi Joseph,

    The last line in your response to PiggyTx definitely goes to show why this thread is such a great success. Your professionalism and dedication to being the best pilot you can be shines through to all of us in this forum; the fact that you are always interested and willing to answer questions, even for a novice like me, is the reason this is one of my favorite FAD threads. Using your vast knowledge by offering to help others overcome their fear of flying is very nice and quite admirable in my book...thank you for serving our country and sharing your outstanding aviation background and incredible experiences- your time is most appreciated.

    Sincerely,

    Cynthia
    Last edited by Cynful; 03-14-2011 at 12:27 AM.

  44. #391
    joS3ph Guest
    Cynthia, it is certainly my pleasure to be able to provide some insight into the often misunderstood/mysterious world of aviation. Personally, it is quite gratifying to be able to accommodate anyone who wishes to learn more. I am not a "know-it-all" by any means, but just as some of you are advancing your knowledge of aviation, I too am advancing my knowledge of your world through your personal experiences. If I can provide some knowledge, comfort or reassurance to those who fly regularly, or to those who have never stepped foot on an airplane, I will consider this thread a success.

    In regards to serving this country, I would do it again tomorrow if necessary. By serving in the military, assurances such as the freedom to disagree, and the ability to explore new horizons is guaranteed. Without the freedoms we possess, we would not be able to publicly express our OWN thoughts, desires or share personal experiences such as these.

    Thanks for the kind words Cynthia!

    Aviatrix, thanks for your detailed and accurate post in regards to the phonetic alphabet! Fantastic explanation.
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-14-2011 at 02:04 AM.

  45. #392
    joS3ph Guest
    Live (slight delay for security reasons) air traffic control audio and radar over the skies of Atlanta and Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

    http://www.airtrafficatlanta.com/
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-14-2011 at 02:14 AM.

  46. #393
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    It is strange that so many people choose to be stupid.


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  47. #394
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    Signed up for your forum, Jos3ph. Same user name as here.
    John Trim On Face Book
    On the internet you can be anything you want.
    It is strange that so many people choose to be stupid.


    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  48. #395
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    Quote Originally Posted by joS3ph View Post
    I am currently in the process of establishing a new aviation discussion forum. The name of this new phpBB forum will be Glass Cockpit. I am in the process of setting up this forum, so at present, there are no messages or topics for discussion.
    Cool! My registration request has been submitted.

  49. #396
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    Joseph, thank you so much for your time and explanations of all things aviation. Your forum on here has been a fantastic help to everyone here - those who are passengers who are eager to learn more, and to people such as myself who have some experience and just LOVE learning more about the inside of aviation from the "big guys."

    Your idea of a separate forum is wonderful, and let us know when it is up and operational. I've already signed up under the name of my favorite aircraft, DC-10.

    Thank you, thank you so much and we look forward to seeing the new forum.

  50. #397
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    Quote Originally Posted by joS3ph View Post
    Personally, it is quite gratifying to be able to accommodate anyone who wishes to learn more. I am not a "know-it-all" by any means, but just as some of you are advancing your knowledge of aviation, I too am advancing my knowledge of your world through your personal experiences.

    This part here bothers me somewhat. Did somebody accuse you of being a "know-it-all"?
    I really hope not, here you are a busy working pilot taking your precious time to explain things to pilots and non pilots alike because you have a really deep love and a extreme amount of knowledgd of what you do.
    Sorry man but that really bothered me to think someone would dump on you
    maybe I read it wrong if I did let me know and I'll delete this post..
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
    R.I.P Kim: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...336317&df=all&
    R.I.P Dad http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=93315851
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  51. #398
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    Quote Originally Posted by joS3ph View Post
    I think you will be able to appreciate this:

    I'll always remember a certain radio exchange that occurred one day as Walt (my backseater) and I were screaming across Southern California. We were monitoring various radio transmissions from other aircraft as we entered Los Angeles airspace. Though they didn't really control us, they did monitor our movement.

    I heard a Cessna ask for a readout of its groundspeed. "90 knots," Center replied. Moments later, a Twin Beech required the same. "120 knots," Center answered.

    We weren't the only ones proud of our groundspeed that day as almost instantly an F/A-18 transmitted, 'Ah, Center, Dusty 52 requests groundspeed readout.' There was a slight pause, then the response, "525 knots on the ground, Dusty."

    Another silent pause. As I was thinking to myself how ripe a situation this was, I heard a familiar click of a radio transmission coming from my backseater. It was at that precise moment I realized Walt and I had become a real crew, for we were both thinking in unison.

    "Center, Aspen 20, you got a groundspeed readout for us?"

    There was a longer than normal pause.... "Aspen, I show 1,242 knots."

    No further inquiries were heard on that frequency.


    F-14 breaking the sound barrier:

    "Where is he?"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Igy_MYJpVcQ
    This is one of the best stories ever- I bet there were no further inquiries on that frequency...what could anyone say after hearing that!!!

  52. #399
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysucks View Post
    This part here bothers me somewhat. Did somebody accuse you of being a "know-it-all"?
    I really hope not, here you are a busy working pilot taking your precious time to explain things to pilots and non pilots alike because you have a really deep love and a extreme amount of knowledgd of what you do.
    Sorry man but that really bothered me to think someone would dump on you
    maybe I read it wrong if I did let me know and I'll delete this post..
    Jersey - I really don't believe that anyone referred to Joseph as a "know-it-all." Throughout the past few months I've had the pleasure of talking with Joe on here, and through PMs and e-mail. I have never talked with him or spoken with him in person, but in general, he comes across as a very humble person, and the last thing he wants to be known as is a know-it-all, and I believe he stated that sentence to mean, although he has a lot of aviation and military experience, he doesn't want to be known as a know-it-all. I know that I'm rambling a bit, and hopefully this makes somewhat sense.

    I believe that all of us really appreciate his knowledge and his time he has taken to dispense of it. I, and probably as well as you, have read this forum from the beginning, and I don't remember anyone calling him a know-it-all.

    Jersey, and I never got back to you, but you are a great contributor here as well. You had a few posts on here that were a real hoot and really had me laughing, and I really appreciated that, so thank you to you, too!

    And Jersey, don't delete your post, it's not necessary. Besides, I've already quoted it and I'm not deleting mine. So there!

  53. #400
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    I have registered at "The Glass cockpit". Can't wait until it's up and running!!
    Everyone must die but not everyone has lived


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