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Thread: Aviation

  1. #251
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    Quote Originally Posted by duchessmary View Post
    Oh I didn't know he was from San Francisco!!
    Actually Danville, a little east of me.
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  2. #252
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    http://www.gadling.com/2011/02/28/vi...ec3_lnk1|47415


    Piolot does donuts with a 737. Cute video
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  3. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysucks View Post
    http://www.gadling.com/2011/02/28/vi...ec3_lnk1|47415


    Piolot does donuts with a 737. Cute video
    All I can say is WOW!!!!!!!
    John Trim On Face Book
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    It is strange that so many people choose to be stupid.


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  4. #254
    joS3ph Guest
    In regards to the Scandinavian Airlines pilot performing a "doughnut," I believe it is unintentional. I think the pilot simply added too much power on a ice/snow-covered ramp and this is the end result. It is evident that the pilot is making inputs to the rudder in an attempt to recover from the situation.

    This particular pilot needs remedial training on how to handle an aircraft on the ground during inclement weather. Clearing active ramps/terminal areas and runways is a priority during periods of ice/snow, so this ramp area should have been cleared prior to use.

  5. #255
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    That must have been an eye-opener for the passengers.

  6. #256
    Oogie Boogie Guest
    JoS3ph, thanks for this thread! I had a lot of fun reading it and I learned a ton.

    Could you tell me which route you took to become a Naval Aviator? Did you go to the Naval Academy or ROTC? Who decides what you end up flying?

  7. #257
    joS3ph Guest
    In regards to taxiing a large commercial aircraft on ice, a pilot must avoid high thrust settings, especially when arriving or leaving the ramp area. A pilot needs to allow a few seconds for the aircraft to respond after applying power.

    Power should be advanced only as necessary to start the aircraft moving, up to approximately 40% N1 (for those not familiar with aircraft/aviation terminology, see my explanation of "N1/N2/N3 speeds" below), then retard the throttles smoothly to idle or to the minimum thrust necessary to maintain appropriate taxi speed. Taxi speed should be as low as practical on slippery surfaces and a taxi speed of 5 knots or less is recommended while turning.

    Sand use on contaminated runways and taxiways presents a foreign object damage hazard (known in the industry as FOD). Power must be reduced for aircraft with wing-mounted engines when operating in icing conditions, as the possibility of further problems, caused by engine ice ingestion pose a significant problem for aircraft with wing-mounted engines.

    The following points must always be considered when operating on surfaces (runways/taxiways) affected by ice/slush/snow:

    Ice, sand or snow blown by engine exhaust can cause damage at considerable distances.

    Speed must be adjusted to surface conditions. Like an automobile, brake effectiveness is reduced. Excessive speed will present problems in stopping and making turns.

    A "crowned" slippery taxiway or runway can cause sideways slipping.

    Maintain increased separation behind other aircraft. Expect other aircraft to require engine run-ups to counteract ice formation.

    Flaps on an aircraft are particularly susceptible to damage if flaps are extended during taxi.

    N1/N2/N3 Speeds (Turbine Engine) Defined:

    N1 speed refers to the innermost rotating shaft of a turbine engine. This shaft will carry the most forward stage of fan blades (compressor) and the most rearward stage of turbine blades. N2 refers to a hollow shaft that rotates around the N1 shaft which carries the second stage of compressor blades and the first stage of turbine blades, if the engine only has two stages.

    If the engine has three stages, then N3 would refer to a third shaft, another hollow shaft, rotating around the second stage shaft, that would carry the third stage of compressor blades and the first stage of turbine blades.

    The turbine blades are driven by the expansion of the burning gases in the combustion chambers. The turbine blades then turn the compressor blades which force air into the combustion chambers. The first turbine stage gets the most pressure and therefore powers the highest stage of compression. The last stage of turbine blades gets the lowest pressure and powers the fist stage of compression.

    Because these speeds (revolutions per minute (RPMs) are high, N1/N2/N3 speeds are expressed as a percentage of the maximum.

    Example: 90% of N1.

  8. #258
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    Joe, I really didn't do a good job explaining why you might get mad at the SAS 737.
    In all your writings you can tell how passionate you are about flying.
    I just didn't know if you would get upset because they weren't overly sure if this guy did it on purpose.
    If it was not on purpose he did a good job coming out of it. If not he was being a hot dog and I don't know how you would take to a pilot hot dogging around like that.
    Anyway it's a cool video. Thought folks might enjoy.
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  9. #259
    joS3ph Guest
    Jersey:

    Feel free to add anything related to aviation that you wish. This thread belongs to you and everyone else that participates. Have fun!

  10. #260
    STsFirstmate Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysucks View Post
    Joe, I really didn't do a good job explaining why you might get mad at the SAS 737.
    In all your writings you can tell how passionate you are about flying.
    I just didn't know if you would get upset because they weren't overly sure if this guy did it on purpose.
    If it was not on purpose he did a good job coming out of it. If not he was being a hot dog and I don't know how you would take to a pilot hot dogging around like that.
    Anyway it's a cool video. Thought folks might enjoy.
    That happened to me in Detroit several years ago. The plane didn't go all the way around but it was enough that people around me were screaming. The run way was really icy and it was sleeting and he went to turn onto the take off run way and accelerate and the plane went totally sideways.
    WE sat there almost an hour ( never told why) and then the plane took off.
    regards,
    Mary

  11. #261
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    Joe,
    Getting completely off topic here but I have to ask.
    You have a job you're passionate about, it sounds like you've done and seen
    so many things in your life.
    So what's on your bucket list?
    I mentioned Cliff Robertson a huge aviation guy and one of his dreams in life was to take a sailplane (not sure which one is more pilots like to use sailplane or glider)
    over the Matterhorn. Don't know if he ever did it or not.
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  12. #262
    joS3ph Guest
    Ooogie Boogie:

    A bachelor's degree is a prerequisite for the U.S. Navy Officer/Pilot Training Program. I received my Bachelor of Science/Aerospace Engineering (BSAE) degree from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Upon acceptance into the "naval aviator career track" (as it is known), I was sent to Naval Officer Candidate School (OCS), Newport, RI.

    Upon completion of OCS (Ensign commission), I attended a six-week naval aviator indoctrination course, Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC), Pensacola, FL. Commanding officers (CO) also complete 20 days of aviation CO training at this time at NASC. The course covered non-aviation matters such as enlisted manpower, financial analysis, military justice and personal/professional development.

    Further, specific course requirements must be fulfilled while at NASC, and this includes basic airmanship, aircraft systems/engines, instrument/formation flying, basic acrobatic maneuvers and solo flight. Completion of this course earned me a qualification to move on to more advanced training in a specific "type" of aircraft. During naval aviator training, one can designate the "type" of aircraft you prefer to pilot while on active duty. I received training for the Grumman F-14A/F-14A+ (F-14B) Tomcat.

    In the U.S. Navy, intermediate/advanced pilot training will occur in one of five naval air "pipelines" as they are termed.

    These five naval "pipelines" are:

    Airborne Early Warning (Carrier/Turboprop)
    Patrol/Reconnaissance (turboprop)
    Rotary (Helicopter).
    Strategic Communications (Multi-Engine Jet)
    Strike (Jet)

    The "pipeline" one is assigned will determine the "type-specific" skills one will learn. I received further, advanced training in what is known as a Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) for the strike "pipeline," which included air combat maneuvers/tactics (ACM), gunnery, weapons, low-level flight and carrier takeoffs/landings. Advanced survival (land/water) training is also provided at this point.

    After FRS assignment and completion of advanced training, I was subsequently assigned to my operational squadron. I was assigned to VFA-103, "Jolly Rogers," Naval Air Station Oceana, VA/Carrier Air Wing Seven (CVW-7) aboard the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier, the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69).

    VF-103 (along with VF-74) worked in unison to develop the fighter tactics which were used in Operation Desert Storm. When the war began in January 1991, VF-103 conducted fighter escort for the air wing’s strike packages, reconnaissance/bomb damage assessment and combat air patrols.

    Grumman F-14 Tomcat attached to VF-103/CVW-7:

    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-01-2011 at 12:43 PM.

  13. #263
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    The F-14 is one of my favorite fighters of all time. What a beautiful, complex airframe. I heard that they're scrapping most retired F-14's so that spare parts don't get into Iranian hands (we sold them Tomcats when the Shah was in power, I think). Is there any truth to this?

  14. #264
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    I used to work in aerospace (remember we went postal before postal went postal) and I worked on the F-14, F15 and the one I really loved the Y AV8b Harrier along with many other military equipment.
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  15. #265
    joS3ph Guest
    Despite its unwieldy appearance and size, an F-14 could haul ass *and* climb!



    An F-14 in a vertical climb:




    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-01-2011 at 03:07 PM.

  16. #266
    joS3ph Guest
    Seven ways to resolve a conflict...


  17. #267
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    I love it!!!!
    Everyone must die but not everyone has lived


  18. #268
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    JoS3ph, with your training focused on the Tomcat, could you or were you ever considered for The Blue Angel, and would you have gone that route?
    John Trim On Face Book
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  19. #269
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    Do you get to really see any of the place you fly to, or is it mostly land, do what you gotta do, and fly back?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Missing my Pa every day. RIP Daddy ❤️♥️
    ‚??Get drunk and sing Elvira‚?Ě
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  20. #270
    joS3ph Guest
    John, I never considered applying for a position on the Blue Angel acrobatic/demonstration team. It would certainly be a thrill, but those guys performance and travel schedule is quite hectic. Make no mistake, I love flying and I certainly wouldn't want to do anything else, but I do enjoy my home time.
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-01-2011 at 08:44 PM.

  21. #271
    joS3ph Guest
    Sassy, I do get to enjoy some of the places where I lay over on occasion. When I arrive at my destination, I may do some exploring while I am there. It all depends on how long I am in the hotel waiting for my outbound flight. We have a legal rest period between flights and if I know I am going to be in town for an extended period, I may get out and visit some of the local tourist traps or have a cup of coffee at Starbucks with a fellow FAD member!
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-01-2011 at 08:55 PM.

  22. #272
    STsFirstmate Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by joS3ph View Post
    John, I never considered applying for a position on the Blue Angel acrobatic/demonstration team. It would certainly be a thrill, but those guys performance and travel schedule is quite hectic. Make no mistake, I love flying and I certainly wouldn't want to do anything else, but I do enjoy my home time.
    I am totally bummed out. The Blue Angles alternate every year with the Thunderbirds at the Joens beach airshow. We always anchor off shore to watch them. Something went awry schedule wise this year and neither group is performing. People are having a fit here and I don't blame them. Over 100,000 people attend the airshow each year and we love living where we can zip out in the boat and watch the practice runs.
    It just won;t be the same this year.
    http://www.jonesbeachairshow.com/
    Regards,
    Mary

  23. #273
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    http://www.space.com/11006-air-force...et-launch.html

    I figured if I started a new post on this they would merge it into this (or not).
    This is a small article about NASA's X37B space craft
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  24. #274
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    Quote Originally Posted by joS3ph View Post
    Sassy, I do get to enjoy some of the places where I lay over on occasion. When I arrive at my destination, I may do some exploring while I am there. It all depends on how long I am in the hotel waiting for my outbound flight. We have a legal rest period between flights and if I know I am going to be in town for an extended period, I may get out and visit some of the local tourist traps or have a cup of coffee at Starbucks with a fellow FAD member!
    I'll buy you a cup of joe if you're ever in San Diego , let me know!

  25. #275
    Oogie Boogie Guest
    JoS3ph,
    Thank you very much for such a comprehensive answer to my questions Do you miss being in the Navy? I would imagine that not being deployed is one of the best things about working as a civilian pilot!

  26. #276
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barbossa View Post
    I'll buy you a cup of joe if you're ever in San Diego , let me know!
    Can I join in?

  27. #277
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulination View Post
    Can I join in?
    But of course!

  28. #278
    joS3ph Guest
    I recently bid on, and was subsequently awarded a Memphis (MEM/KMEM) to Anchorage (ANC/PANC) assignment, so I won't be flying to the west coast for the next 30 days. If anyone on the west coast would like to meet up to have a cup of coffee (or Dr. Pepper, or whatever), please let me know. When I return to my previous Memphis-Oakland assignment next month, I would be honored to meet some of my FAD friends!

    Oogie Boogie, I do miss being in the Navy sometimes. Like most former military, I really appreciate civilian stability. While in the Navy, I did see action during Operation Desert Storm (Gulf War), so I am very thankful that I was able to return home, healthy and without injury.

    During the conflict, our aircraft carrier was positioned in the Persian Gulf, and I flew numerous sorties providing air-to-air support. I received plenty of experience landing on an aircraft carrier at night and also with in-flight refueling, as each sortie required two, in-flight refuelings.

    Tomcat in the "circuit" at NAS Oceana:



    VF-103 Tomcats on the flight line at NAS Oceana:



    AA-104 of VF-103 tied down on the deck near Palma de Mallorca Bay, Spain:

    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-03-2011 at 03:07 PM.

  29. 03-03-2011, 03:02 PM

  30. #279
    joS3ph Guest
    A few more VF-103 Tomcat images...

    A VF-103 F-14B Tomcat launches from the number one catapult:



    In-flight refueling:



    VF-103 Tomcat high-speed pass and sonic boom while at sea in the Caribbean, conducting integrated training exercises:



    VF-103 Tomcat air-to-air image (over the Persian Gulf):

    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-03-2011 at 03:27 PM.

  31. #280
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    Great pics, Joe!!!! Thanks for posting.
    Everyone must die but not everyone has lived


  32. #281
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    Just wondering, what kind of plane is breaking the sound barrier in my avi?
    Can you tell?
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  33. #282
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysucks View Post
    Just wondering, what kind of plane is breaking the sound barrier in my avi?
    Can you tell?
    The question might not be directed at me, but it's an F-18. I don't know what variant, though.

  34. #283
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    Alot of people here talk about their military backgrounds.
    Since I could never join I am a volunteer and in any skirmish I would become a prisoner of war.
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  35. #284
    joS3ph Guest
    Final approach to Runway 08L in Munich, Germany (MUC/EDDM):


  36. #285
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    Joe is that clouds or fog over Munich?
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  37. #286
    joS3ph Guest
    It's fog Jersey.

    On descent into Bangkok with a large line of Thai thunderstorms. Note the returns on the radar (second display from the right).


    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-03-2011 at 07:33 PM.

  38. #287
    joS3ph Guest
    Seconds from departure. Runway 24L at YUL/CYUL (Montreal):



  39. #288
    jaylene Guest
    I enjoy these pics so much. Thanks for posting. Just awesome!

  40. #289
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    Awesome pix, Joe. Glad your here.
    John Trim On Face Book
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    It is strange that so many people choose to be stupid.


    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  41. #290
    joS3ph Guest
    If anyone has any interesting aviation photographs or stories, I'd appreciate seeing them or hearing your stories.

    This is our view while taxing to runway 06L for our departure (parking brake "set" of course). The RVR (Runway Visual Range) was dropping as we neared the runway. (It got to 900 feet). Translation...I had to do the takeoff. (RVRs below 1,200 feet must be performed by the captain). We also had to get a takeoff alternate. A takeoff alternate must be available when visibility goes below the required visibility for the approach in use. Generally when it goes below 1/2 mile. For this particular airplane, it must be within a 340 nautical mile radius. This "plan B" airport is a requirement in case we lose an engine and we can't come back to land.



    You know it's a foggy morning when air traffic control (ATC) clears us to hold short of the CAT III hold line. In CAT III (or Category III) operations, there is no DH (decision height) and the minimum RVR (runway visual range) is 700 feet. Aircraft are kept further away during CAT II and CAT III operations because the aircraft may interfere with the instrument landing system (ILS) signals.


  42. #291
    joS3ph Guest
    This photo was taken while lining up on the runway in the middle of the night enroute to Toronto - non stop. The airport was reporting an RVR (runway visual range) of 600 feet, but if you count the runway lights (separated every 200 feet), you'll see we had just over 800 feet. These takeoffs, at max weight, made for some interesting departures.


  43. #292
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    If I read right on runway lights aren't there 3 different levels to them with 3 different colors so you know you're coming in fine, a little low or too low?
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  44. #293
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    Oh Yoda of the skies JoS3ph I have an inquiry for you. When you shoe a pic of your FEDEX plane (MD-11) I saw that when you posted a pic of the yoke that said MD-11.
    Here's my question finally you are also rated on a Boeing 777 which uses a fly by wire system.
    Any preferences? Easier to fly by wire or Yoke?
    I actually have studied so I do know a little of the lingo but what I don't know can fill a room of encyclopedias.
    If you were ever in Jersey and you can get here without being mugged or shot at when you leave EWR (Newark Liberty Airport) I would be honored to buy you a cup of coffee or a Dr Pepper but you have to let me do some touch and goes in your MD-11 at Teterboro airport. (Wouldn't that be a great trick landing a plane of that size at Teterboro? you'd have all the communities come after you with torches and pitchforks.)
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
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  45. #294
    joS3ph Guest
    Excellent question Jersey. This is going to be a rather long post, but here we go. To assist pilots in differentiating between airport runways and lights from automobiles, buildings, and roadways at night (or in low light conditions), airports use standardized lighting to provide runway direction and identification. For the sake of simplicity, I have included measurements in both feet and meters.

    Runway Lights



    Airport Lighting

    Although airport lighting systems aren't the same everywhere, the use of that lighting and the colors are consistent. A large commercial airport has many different lighting systems to indicate the airport layout and to help guide pilots on approach. A small airport may have simple lighting to outline the edges of the runway, and on some very small, private airfields, there may not be any lighting at all.

    Runway Lighting

    Land and hold short lights are sometimes used at airports where runways intersect. Smaller aircraft that are capable of landing and stopping before the intersection, otherwise known as "holding short," may be given permission to do so. A row of pulsating white lights are installed across the runway to indicate "hold short" position.

    Runway centerline lights (or RCLS-runway centerline lighting system)are white lights embedded into the runway centerline at 50 feet (15 meter) intervals along the runway centerline on some precision instrument runways. For the last 3,000 feet (914 meters) of runway, the lights alternate between white and red for 2,000 feet (610 meters), and red for the final 1,000 feet (305 meters).

    Runway edge lights (REL) are elevated, white lights that outline each side of a runway for its full length. On precision instrument runways (instrument approach procedures), the edge lighting is yellow for the last 2,000 feet (610 meters) of the runway, or the last half of the runway, whichever is less. Taxiways are bordered by blue lights, or by having green center lights, depending on the width of the taxiway, and the complexity of the taxi pattern.

    Runway end identification lights (REIL) are unidirectional (facing the direction of approach), flashing white lights or an omnidirectional (synchronized flashing lights that flash on either side of the threshold), to give positive indication of the approach end of a runway.

    Runway end identification lights are a pair of four lights on both ends of the runway on precision instrument runways. These lights extend along the full width of the runway. These lights appear green to approaching aircraft. They look red from the runway itself. Lights at the end of the runway are red to a departing aircraft and green at the beginning to signify the threshold of landing for approaching aircraft.

    Taxiway centerline lead-off lights are alternating green and yellow lights embedded into the runway pavement, leading from the runway centerline to the taxiway. These lights offer visual direction to pilots leaving the runway. It starts with a green light, from the runway centerline to the position of first centerline light beyond holding position on taxiway. Also, see "taxiway centerline lead-on lights" below.

    Taxiway centerline lead-on lights are alternating green and yellow lights embedded into the runway pavement, leading from the taxiway to the runway centerline. Also see "taxiway centerline lead-off lights" above.

    Touchdown zone lights (TDZL) are rows of white light bars (with three in each row) embedded into the runway on either side of the centerline. They extend from 100 feet (30 meters) past the runway threshold to either 3,000 feet (914 meters) or to the midpoint of the runway, whichever is less.

    Taxiway Lighting

    Clearance bar lights are three embedded yellow lights that indicate a designated holding point on a taxiway.

    Stop bar lights are a row of embedded red lights at the holding point immediately before a runway. These lights are operated from the control tower, and are turned off when clearance is given to the aircraft to proceed onto the runway.

    Taxiway centerline lights are green lights embedded into the taxiway centerline. These lights also extend from the taxiway onto the aircraft maneuvering area, or apron, along designated aircraft movement lines.

    Taxiway edge lights are raised blue lights that outline each side of a taxiway.

    Other Airport Lighting Systems

    Approach lights/Approach Lighting System (ALS) (this is the system of lights you are referring to in your post Jersey)

    The approach lighting system (ALS) is a system composed of sequenced lights/strobe lights that is installed on the approach end of a runway to assist the pilot in making the transition from an instrument landing to a visual approach (i.e., this system signals the pilot where the beginning of the runway is and where approach should commence). It is most commonly referred to as an ALS, or approach lighting system. These systems are used mostly at airports with instrument approach procedures to line up the aircraft with the runway. These lights extend backwards from the runway threshold for 1,500 (457 meters) or 3,000 feet (914 meters).

    These lights are crucial to the safe landing of planes due to the way that angle of descent and the speed of the plane will distort the perspective of the runway and its true distance from the plane. The ALS, with its white bars and flashing strobe lights, provides clearly differentiated visible cues that allow the pilot to line up the plane for landing. To the pilot, these lights appear to be traveling along the pathway toward the runway centerline (often nicknamed the "rabbit" due to the way the lights appear to be "chasing" each other in sequence).

    Visible Glidescope Indicators

    Visual glideslope indicator lights entail two different lighting systems that help pilots visually control their approach path. These are called the Visual Approach Slope Indicator, or VASI, and Precision Approach Path Indicator, or PAPI. Both of these systems are made up of sets of white and red lights arranged such that if the pilot is above the flight path, only white lights display; if below the flight path, only red lights display; if on the correct flight path, the lights display a mix of red and white.

    Runway Markings (Approach End)



    Explanation of Terms:

    Note: For terms where an explanation has not been provided, please consult the "Pilot/Controller Glossary," (link) for further information.

    Glidescope (GS) provides vertical guidance for aircraft during approach and landing. A system of radio navigation aids which provides lateral and vertical guidance, as well as other navigational parameters required by a pilot on approach.

    Instrument Approach Procedures
    are a series of predetermined maneuvers for the orderly transfer of an aircraft under instrument flight conditions, from the beginning of the initial approach to a landing, or to a point from which a landing may be made visually or the missed approach procedure is initiated.

    Instrument Landing System (ILS) is a precision instrument approach system which normally consists of the following electronic components and visual aids: approach lights, glidescope, localizer, outer marker and middle marker.

    Missed Approach/Missed Approach Procedure is an instrument flight rules (IFR) procedure which is a standard (but optional) component segment of an instrument approach. Generally, if the pilot flying or the pilot in command (PIC) determines by the time the aircraft is at the decision height (for a precision approach) or missed approach point (for a non-precision approach), that the runway or its environment is not in sight, or that a safe landing cannot be accomplished for any reason, the landing approach must be discontinued and the missed approach procedure must be initiated immediately.

    Precision Instrument Runway ("Instrument Runway") is a runway having an operative nonvisual precision approach aid (i.e., instrument landing system [ILS]) specially marked with nonprecision instrument runway indications along with a touchdown zone, fixed-distance markers, and side strips. The normal markings for such runways include the centerline marking, designation marking, fixed-distance marking, touchdown zone marking, side stripes, holding position markings for a taxiway, or runway intersection and ILS critical areas, holding position markings at runways or runway intersections when runways are normally used for land, hold-short operations, or taxiing.

    Threshold is the beginning of the landing surface at the approach end of a runway.

    I hope this helps. If you need a further explanation, or have additional questions, please do not hesitate to ask.
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-05-2011 at 12:48 PM.

  46. #295
    joS3ph Guest
    I will be home this coming week, and most of the following, as I have mandatory simulator time scheduled, and I also have to attend several training classes (cockpit resource management/officer training and performance recurrent/general recurrent training).

    I will most likely be posting more images and answering more questions if anyone has anything they would like to ask. All I ask is that you bear with me, as I have much to do. If anyone has anything related to aviation they would like to share, please do so.

    I haven't forgot about your "fly-by-wire" question Jersey! I prefer the "fly-by-wire" (FBW) system because FBW generally means quadruply redundant systems. FBW aircraft tend to adapt to all phases of flight more readily. FBW aircraft have the same "feel" as other types, and FBW aircraft generally interact more precisely with modern digital autopilots/avionics.

    For those unfamiliar with the terminology, "fly-by-wire" aircraft respond to electrical signals (instead of direct, mechanical linkages) from the flight deck (side stick controller, control column, rudder pedals). FBW computers route electrical signals from the flight deck to a hydraulic servo located at or near the corresponding control surface (i.e., flaps, rudder, etc.). The servo then ports hydraulic fluid to one or more actuators which actually move the control surface.

    Conventional cable/push rod, hydraulically actuated systems work in the same way, except a cable is used, instead of an electrical signal. Conventional cable/push rod systems have no mechanical backup. If you lose all hydraulic power, the primary control surfaces cannot be moved.

    The only electric motors one will find in a conventional cable/push rod system are in the trim system. The horizontal stabilizer on some aircraft can be adjusted using electric motors and jackshafts. Electric motors are not used in the primary flight controls because they respond too slowly.
    Last edited by joS3ph; 03-05-2011 at 05:52 PM.

  47. #296
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    OK - where bows and arrows are broken
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    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerseysucks View Post
    If you were ever in Jersey and you can get here without being mugged or shot at when you leave EWR (Newark Liberty Airport) I would be honored to buy you a cup of coffee or a Dr Pepper but you have to let me do some touch and goes in your MD-11 at Teterboro airport. (Wouldn't that be a great trick landing a plane of that size at Teterboro? you'd have all the communities come after you with torches and pitchforks.)
    Hey Jersey! You're near Teterboro! There's this hilarious little aviation song that's sort of big in aviation circles. It contains a lot of aviation jargon, but it's not entirely necessary to know the full meanings to get a kick out of this song. When you said Teterboro, I immediately thought of this little song.

    Joe, does this sound familiar, "Teterboro Tower this is Piper 202."? A few years ago for Christmas, I hired a CFI to give my husband an intro flight in a REAL bird (none of this simulation stuff mind ya and we all went up in a C-172. Needless to say, he LOVED it and we took a lot of pics. He went home and made a photo story using the song "Teterboro Tower." If you all get a chance, listen to the youtube version (sorry, not us. :P) It's hilarious even to non-aviation individuals.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5fSYTmrBzI
    Last edited by Aviatrix; 03-07-2011 at 06:38 PM.

  48. #297
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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    John Trim On Face Book
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  49. #298
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Disgusting state of NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aviatrix View Post
    Hey Jersey! You're near Teterboro! There's this hilarious little aviation song that's sort of big in aviation circles. It contains a lot of aviation jargon, but it's not entirely necessary to know the full meanings to get a kick out of this song. When you said Teterboro, I immediately thought of this little song.

    Joe, does this sound familiar, "Teterboro Tower this is Piper 202."? A few years ago for Christmas, I hired a CFI to give my husband an intro flight in a REAL bird (none of this simulation stuff mind ya and we all went up in a C-172. Needless to say, he LOVED it and we took a lot of pics. He went home and made a photo story using the song "Teterboro Tower." If you all get a chance, listen to the youtube version (sorry, not us. :P) It's hilarious even to non-aviation individuals.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5fSYTmrBzI

    Yes I an near Teterboro, I used to work across the street, my son works next door and my daughter was in the hospital about 10 min away from there (Hackensack Univ. Med.Ctr).
    I don't know how much you hear in OK but a plane landed on Rte 80 just shy of Teterboro Airport.
    On the day before a job interview I got in touch with someone from a job I used to work in the neighborhood. He was going to bring me some things I needed for the interview. The restaurant was just before the airport and down the road. That was the day a corporate jet crashed thru the fence over both sides of the highway and crashed thru a building.
    BTW yes I did love that song, I understood most of it. I studied the instruction manuals and even taken the controls of a low wing a few times but for me it wasn't the rush I've always envisioned it to be.
    You read this board and you can tell everybody who flies has a real passion for it. My passion is to be a passenger. Hey someones got to be one right?
    When you lose a parent you lose your past. When you lose a spouse you lose your present. When you lose a child you lose your future.
    R.I.P Kim: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...336317&df=all&
    R.I.P Dad http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=93315851
    R.I.P Mom http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg...&GRid=97780420

  50. #299
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Connecticut, You know home of ESPN
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Trim View Post
    .

    Is that plywood?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

    "I will be buried in a spring loaded casket filled with confetti, and a future archaeologist will have one awesome day at work."

  51. #300
    joS3ph Guest
    I can assure you that particular plane is either in long-term storage or is being cannibalized for parts. It's not airworthy at any rate.

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