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Thread: Alday Family Murders in Donalsonville, Georgia

  1. #1
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    Alday Family Murders in Donalsonville, Georgia

    This has haunted me since I was a young boy...

    Man Convicted Again in Killing of Georgia Family

    By JERRY SCHWARTZ, Special to the New York Times
    Published: January 26, 1988

    ATLANTA, Jan. 25— A man convicted more than 13 years ago of murdering six members of a rural Georgia family was again convicted of those murders tonight.

    The man, Carl Isaacs, 34 years old, was convicted of the six murders in 1974, but a series of appeals culminated in a December 1985 ruling by the United States Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit that he and two co-defendants were entitled to new trials.

    The attack on the Alday family of Donalsonville, Ga., in which five men were killed and one woman was raped and killed was called ''the most heinous crime in Georgia'' by Gov. Jimmy Carter.

    Jurors in the retrial at Perry, Ga., deliberated two hours and 10 minutes before returning the guilty verdicts on six counts of murder. In a separate sentencing phase due to begin Tuesday, prosecutors are to ask the jurors to again sentence Mr. Isaacs to death. The two other defendants are awaiting separate retrials. Sentenced to Death in 1974

    Mr. Isaacs was sentenced to death 1974, along with his half-brother Wayne C. Coleman, now 41, and Mr. Coleman's friend, George E. Dungee, 49, for the Alday murders. Since Mr. Isaacs's trial, a number of fellow inmates and law-enforcement officers have said that Mr. Isaacs spoke openly, even bragged about his role in slaying the family.

    During this month's trial in Houston County Superior Court, jurors heard a tape recording made several years after the murders in which Mr. Isaacs confessed his role in the murders to a film producer. Mr. Isaacs's younger brother Billy, 29, who was traveling with the three defendants at the time of the murders, also testified to Carl Isaacs's role in the events of May 14, 1973.

    Billy Isaacs, who pleaded guilty to armed robbery and is currently serving his jail sentence, testified, as he had at the first trial, that the Aldays were murdered over a period of several hours as they returned, singly or in pairs, to the trailer home of Jerry Alday. The victims were Ned Alday, 62 years old; his brother, Aubrey, 57; three of Ned Alday's sons, Jerry, 35, Jimmy, 25, and Chester, 32, as well as Jerry Alday's wife, Mary, 25.

    Billy Isaacs testified that the four had driven to the Alday home looking for money and drugs and were interrupted in their attempted burglary by the return of the family members.

    The defense did not call any witnesses in the retrial. Defense attorney, Michael Schiavone argued to jurors that the prosecution had not proven its case. ''Don't make a quick decision,'' he told the jurors. ''Discuss this evidence. Discuss everything carefully, because it's the only opportunity Carl Isaacs has.''

    Since his conviction, Carl Isaacs has been implicated in two attempted escapes, an extortion plot and a prison stabbing. The Appeals Court's Decision

    In a 128-page opinion in December 1985, one of the longest in the history of the appeals court for the 11th Circuit, three Federal judges said they noted ''overwhelming evidence of guilt'' of the three men. Nevertheless, ''inflamatory and prejudicial pretrial publicity,'' the judges wrote, ''so pervaded the community as to render virtually impossible a fair trial before an impartial jury.''

    The judges noted in their opinion that the surviving members of the Alday family paid $5,000 to hire a special prosecutor, former Lieut. Gov. Peter Zack Geer, a nephew of the judge at the first trial, Walter I. Geer. The sheriff of Seminole County, where the crime had occurred, was quoted as saying, ''If I had my way about it, I'd have me a large oven and I'd precook them for several days.''

    In such an atmosphere, ''it is inconceivable to think,'' the court wrote, that the defendants ''received an impartial assessment.''

    A petition demanding the impeachment of Appeals Court Judges R. Lanier Anderson 3d, Frank M. Johnson Jr. and Thomas A. Clark gathered some 100,000 signatures in Georgia. However, a committee of the United States House of Representatives rejected the petitions.

  2. #2
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    Interesting story... I had never heard of this one. I was too young in the 80s to have paid attention.

  3. #3
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    bump

  4. #4
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    I was in the 11th grade and do not recall this happening, but a few years later I read the book. This murder case has always haunted me. You never know what's behind a door. You come home from work or shopping or whatever, step up to that door, unlock it, or find it already unlocked--and you wonder how you could have forgotten to lock it--and you open that door, and step inside to the normal rhythms of your household or to monsters laying in wait.
    "Do no harm, But take no crap."-- pksracy



  5. #5
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    another death

    When Mary Alday's mother was told of her daughter's death, she suffered a fatal heart attack..

  6. #6
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    Sad.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cindyt View Post
    I was in the 11th grade and do not recall this happening, but a few years later I read the book. This murder case has always haunted me. You never know what's behind a door. You come home from work or shopping or whatever, step up to that door, unlock it, or find it already unlocked--and you wonder how you could have forgotten to lock it--and you open that door, and step inside to the normal rhythms of your household or to monsters laying in wait.

    I went out with a moron when I was still on the force and when we came home to his place at night, I had to go in first because his sister had been robbed and they surprised her when she came home so he was afraid to go into the house after dark alone. LOL That relationship didnt last long lol He wanted me to kick open doors like they do in the movies..this guy was 6'4 lol Pussy.

  8. #8
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    There is also a made-for-television movie about this...I think it's called Murder One. I will try to find it...

  9. #9
    This was my family an i wish i would have got to meet them but god said it was time to go an as long as god say it then its okay but i jus really wish they would not have had to of been take away lik that an one day i wish to fing out the name of the movie an book about this but an body got any info please email me at (sierra.widner@yahoo.com) Thanks!!!

  10. #10
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    Nearly 30 years after the Alday murders, Carl Isaacs, at the time the nation's longest surviving death row inmate, was put to death on May 6th, 2003 by lethal injection. It was process that left many bitter at the legal system questioning whether justice was ever really served. The fact that he even got a second trial is unbelievable! The only good thing I learned is that Issacs was suffering from cancer and wore a colostomy bag into the death chamber. Billy Isaacs served 20 years in prison and died a free man in 2009, too bad. George Dungee died in prison in 2006. Unfortunately Wayne Coleman is still alive, serving a life sentence at Georgia State Prison in Reidsville. These guys were definitely the lowest forms of human beings...
    Last edited by Dangitbawb; 12-02-2014 at 03:38 PM.
    By my troth, I care not; a man can die but once; we owe God a death.... He that dies this year is quit for the next.
    --William Shakespeare!

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