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Thread: Hattie McDaniel

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    Hattie McDaniel

    Hattie McDaniel (June 10, 1895 ‚?? October 26, 1952) was an American actress and the first black performer to win an Academy Award. She won the award for Best Supporting Actress for her role of Mammy in Gone with the Wind (1939). McDaniel was also a professional singer-songwriter, comedienne, stage actress, radio performer and television star. Hattie McDaniel was in fact the first black woman to sing on the radio in America.[1][2] Over the course of her career, McDaniel appeared in over 300 films, although she only received screen credits for about 80. She gained the respect of the African American show business community with her generosity, elegance and charm.
    McDaniel has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Hollywood: one for her contributions to radio at 6933 Hollywood Boulevard, and one for motion pictures at 1719 Vine Street. In 1975, she was inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame, and in 2006 became the first black Oscar winner honored with a US postage stamp.[3]

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    Background and early acting career

    Hattie McDaniel was born June 10, 1895, in Wichita, Kansas, to former slaves and Civil War soldier Henry McDaniel and Susan Holbert, a singer of religious music.[4] She was the youngest of thirteen children. In 1900, the family moved to Colorado, living first in Fort Collins and then in Denver, where Hattie grew up. McDaniel dropped out of East Denver High School after her sophomore year to enter show business. She toured with her father's own Henry McDaniel minstrel show, which costarred her two brothers, Sam and Otis. In 1910, she was the only African American participant in a Women's Christian Temperance Union event in which she won a gold medal for reciting a poem entitled Convict Joe. Winning the award was what started and sparked her dream of becoming a performer.
    In addition to performing, Hattie was also a songwriter, a skill she honed while working with her father's minstrel show. After the death of her brother, Otis, in 1916, the troupe began to lose profits, and it wasn't until 1920 that Hattie received another big opportunity. During 1920–25, she appeared with Professor George Morrison's Melony Hounds, a touring black ensemble, and in the mid-1920s she embarked on a radio career, singing with the Melony Hounds on station KOA in Denver.[5] In 1927–1929 she also recorded many of her songs on Okeh Records,[6] and with Paramount Records[7] in Chicago.
    When the stock market crashed in 1929, the only work McDaniel could find was as a washroom attendant and waitress at Club Madrid in Milwaukee. Despite the owner's reluctance to let her perform, McDaniel was eventually allowed to take the stage, and became a regular.
    In 1931, McDaniel made her way to Los Angeles to join her brother Sam,[8] sisters Etta[9] and Orlena. When she could not get film work, she took jobs as a maid or cook. Sam was working on KNX radio program called The Optimistic Do-Nut Hour, and he was able to get his sister a spot. She appeared on radio as 'Hi-Hat Hattie', a bossy maid who often "forgets her place". Her show became extremely popular, but her salary was so low that she had to continue working as a maid. Her first film appearance was in The Golden West (1932), as a maid, her second, was in the highly successful Mae West film, I'm No Angel, as one of the plump black maids West camped it up with backstage at West's circus performances. In the early years of the 1930s she received roles in several films, often singing in choruses. In 1934, McDaniel joined the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), and began to attract attention and finally landed larger film roles that began to win her screen credits. Fox Film Corporation put her under contract to appear in The Little Colonel (1935), with Shirley Temple, Bill "Bojangles" Robinson, and Lionel Barrymore.

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    1934's Judge Priest, directed by John Ford and starring Will Rogers, was the first film in which she would receive a major role. She had a leading part in the film and demonstrated her singing talent, including a duet with Rogers. McDaniel and Rogers became friends during filming. McDaniel had prominent roles in 1935 with her classic performance as a slovenly maid in RKO Pictures' Alice Adams, and a delightfully comic part as Jean Harlow's maid/traveling companion in MGM's China Seas, the latter her first film with Clark Gable. She had a featured role as Queenie in Universal Pictures' 1936 version of Show Boat starring Irene Dunne, and sang a verse of Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man with Helen Morgan, Paul Robeson, and the African-American chorus. Later in the film she and Robeson sang I Still Suits Me, a song written especially by Kern and Hammerstein for the film. After Show Boat she had major roles in MGM's Saratoga (1937), starring Jean Harlow and Clark Gable, The Shopworn Angel (1938) with Margaret Sullavan, and The Mad Miss Manton (1938), starring Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda.
    McDaniel had befriended several of Hollywood's most popular white stars, including Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Shirley Temple, Henry Fonda, Ronald Reagan, Olivia de Havilland and Clark Gable, with whom she would star in Gone with the Wind. It was around this time that she began to be criticized by members of the black community for roles she was choosing to take. 1935's The Little Colonel depicted black servants longing for a return to the Old South. Ironically, McDaniel's portrayal of Malena in RKO Pictures' Alice Adams angered white Southern audiences. She managed to steal several scenes away from the film's star, Katharine Hepburn. This was the type of role she would be best known for, the sassy, independently minded, and opinionated maid.
    The competition in Gone with the Wind (1939) to play Mammy had been almost as stiff as that for Scarlett O'Hara. Eleanor Roosevelt wrote to film producer David O. Selznick to ask that her own maid, Elizabeth McDuffie, be given the part.[10] McDaniel did not think she would be chosen, because she was known for being a comic actress. Clark Gable recommended the role go to McDaniel, and when she went to her audition dressed in an authentic maid's uniform, Selznick knew he had found Mammy. Gable was delighted to be working again with McDaniel.[11]
    The Loew's Grand Theatre on Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia, was selected as the theatre for the premiere of Gone with the Wind, Friday, December 15, 1939. When the date of the Atlanta premiere approached, all the black actors were barred from attending, and excluded from being in the souvenir program. David Selznick had at least attempted to bring Hattie McDaniel, but MGM advised him not to because of Georgia's segregationist laws, which would have required McDaniel to stay in a coloured-only hotel, and prevented her from sitting in the theater with her white peers. Clark Gable angrily threatened to boycott the Atlanta premiere unless McDaniel was allowed to attend, but McDaniel convinced him to attend anyway.[12] Most of Atlanta's 300,000 citizens crowded the route of the seven-mile motorcade that carried the film's other stars and executives from the airport to the Georgian Terrace Hotel, where they stayed.[13][14] While the Jim Crow laws kept McDaniel from the Atlanta premiere, she did attend the Hollywood debut on December 28, 1939. This time, upon Selznick's insistence, her picture was featured prominently in the program. (It would also be included in programs for all areas outside of the South.)[15]
    It was her role as the sassy servant who repeatedly scolds her mistress, Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh), and scoffs at Rhett Butler (Clark Gable), that won McDaniel the 1939 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, making her the first African American to win an Oscar. She was also the first African American ever to be nominated. "I loved Mammy," McDaniel said. "I think I understood her because my own grandmother worked on a plantation not unlike Tara".[16] Her role in Gone with the Wind had scared her Southern audience and in the South, there were complaints that in the film she had been too familiar with her white employer.[17]

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    I read that she had a realtionship with Tallulah Bankhead. Wonder who was the bitch and who was the butch?
    You'd be well advised not to plan my funeral before the body dies...

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    She was a wonderful actress. I think she made Gone With the Wind.

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    Oscar night

    Louella Parsons, an American gossip columnist, wrote about Oscar night of 1940: "Hattie McDaniel earned that gold "Oscar", by her fine performance of "Mammy" in Gone with the Wind. If you had seen her face when she walked up to the platform and took the gold trophy, you would have had the choke in your voice that all of us had when Hattie, hair trimmed with gardenias, face alight, and dress up to the queen's taste, accepted the honor in one of the finest speeches ever given on the Academy floor. She put her heart right into those words and expressed not only for herself, but for every member of her race, the gratitude she felt that she had been given recognition by the Academy. Fay Bainter, with voice trembling, introduced Hattie and spoke of the happiness she felt in bestowing upon the beaming actress Hollywood's greatest honor. Her proudest possession is the red silk petticoat that David Selznick gave her when she finished Gone with the Wind". [18]


    Hattie McDaniel's Acceptance Speech delivered on January 29, 1940 at the 12th Annual Academy Awards:
    "Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, fellow members of the motion picture industry and honoured guests: This is one of the happiest moments of my life, and I want to thank each one of you who had a part in selecting me for one of their awards, for your kindness. It has made me feel very, very humble; and I shall always hold it as a beacon for anything that I may be able to do in the future. I sincerely hope I shall always be a credit to my race and to the motion picture industry. My heart is too full to tell you just how I feel, and may I say thank you and God bless you."[19][20]


    Gone with the Wind was awarded ten Academy Awards, a record that would stand for years, and has been named by the American Film Institute (AFI) as number six among the top 100 American films of all time.[21]

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    Later acting career

    As the 1940s progressed, the servant roles McDaniel and other African American performers had so frequently played were subjected to increasingly strong criticism by groups such as the NAACP. In response to the NAACP's criticism, McDaniel replied, "I'd rather play a maid and make $700 a week than be one for $7."
    In 1942's Warner Bros., In This Our Life, she once again played a domestic, starring Bette Davis and directed by John Huston; character confronts racial issues as her law student son is wrongly accused of manslaughter. The following year, McDaniel was in Warner Bros., Thank Your Lucky Stars, with Humphrey Bogart and Bette Davis. In 1943, Time wrote about McDaniel, "Hattie McDaniel, whose bubbling, blaring good humor more than redeems the roaring bad taste of a Harlem number called "Ice Cold Katie" [musical number by Dinah Shore].[22] Hattie McDaniel continued to play maids during the war years, in Warner Bros., The Male Animal (1942), and United Artists, Since You Went Away (1944), but her feistiness was toned down.
    She made her last film appearances, Mickey and Family Honeymoon (1949), but was still quite active in her final years on radio and television, becoming the first major African American radio star with her comedy series Beulah. She starred in the ABC television version, taking over for Ethel Waters after the first season. It was a hit, earning McDaniel $2,000 a week. After filming a handful of episodes, however, McDaniel learned she had breast cancer. By the spring of 1952, she was too ill to work and was replaced by Louise Beavers.[23]

    [edit] Off-camera


    [edit] Legal case: Victory on "Sugar Hill"

    Time magazine, December 17, 1945:
    Their story was as old as it was ugly. In 1938, Negroes, willing and able to pay $15,000 and up for West Adams, Los Angeles, California, Heights property, had begun moving into the old colonial mansions. Many were movie folk—Actresses Louise Beavers, Hattie McDaniel, Ethel Waters, etc. They improved their holdings, kept their well-defined ways, quickly won more than tolerance from most of their white neighbors. But some whites, refusing to be comforted, had drawn up a racial restrictive covenant among themselves. For seven years they had tried to sell it to the other whites, but failed. Then they went to court. Superior Judge Thurmond Clarke decided to visit the disputed ground—popularly known as "Sugar Hill." Next morning, Judge Clarke threw the case out of court. His reason: "It is time that members of the Negro race are accorded, without reservations or evasions, the full rights guaranteed them under the 14th Amendment to the Federal Constitution. Judges have been avoiding the real issue too long." Said Hattie McDaniel, of West Adams Heights: "Words cannot express my appreciation." [24] It was McDaniel, the most famous of the black homeowners, who helped to organize the black West Adams residents that saved their homes. Loren Miller, a local attorney and owner/publisher of the California Eagle newspaper represented the homeowners in their restrictive covenant case.[25] In 1944, he won the case Fairchild v Rainers, a decision for a black Pasadena, California family that had bought a non restricted lot but was sued by white neighbors anyway.
    McDaniel had purchased her white two-story, seventeen-room mansion in 1942. The house included a large living room, dining room, drawing room, den, butler's pantry, kitchen, service porch, library, four bedrooms, and a basement. McDaniel had a yearly Hollywood party. Everyone knew that the king of Hollywood, Clark Gable, would be faithfully present at all of McDaniel's Movieland parties.[26]

    [edit] Community service

    McDaniel was also a member of Sigma Gamma Rho, one of four African-American Greek letter sororities in the United States. During World War II, McDaniel was the Chairman of the Negro Division of the Hollywood Victory Committee, providing entertainment for soldiers stationed at military bases. She also put in numerous personal appearances to hospitals, threw parties, performed at United Service Organizations (USO) shows and war bond rallies, to raise funds to support the war, on behalf of the Victory Committee.[27][28] Bette Davis also performed for black regiments as the only white member of an acting troupe formed by Hattie McDaniel, that also included Lena Horne and Ethel Waters.[29]
    She joined Clarence Muse for an NBC radio broadcast to raise funds for Red Cross relief programs for Americans, many of them black, who had been displaced by the year's devastating floods. Within the black community, she gained a reputation for generous giving, often without question feeding and lending money to friends and stranger alike.[30]

    [edit] Marriages

    While her career was advancing in the 1920s, her husband, George Langford, died soon after she married him in 1922, and her father died the same year. She married Howard Hickman in 1938 but divorced him later the same year. In 1941, she married James Lloyd Crawford, real estate salesman. In the book Bright Boulevards, Bold Dreams, by Donald Bogle, it is referenced that in 1945, McDaniel happily informed gossip columnist Hedda Hopper that she was pregnant. McDaniel began buying baby clothes and setting up a nursery. Her plans were shattered when the doctor informed her she had a false pregnancy; McDaniel fell into a depression. She divorced Crawford in 1945, after four and a half years of marriage. She said he was jealous of her career and once threatened to kill her.[31]
    In Yuma, Arizona, on June 11, 1949, she married Larry Williams, interior decorator. She divorced him in 1950, after testifying that their five months together had been marred by "arguing and fussing." Ms. McDaniel broke down in tears when she testified that her husband tried to create dissension among the cast of her radio show and otherwise interfered with her work. "I haven't got over it yet," she said. "I got so I couldn't sleep. I couldn't concentrate on my lines."[32][33]

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    Death

    McDaniel died at age 57, in the hospital on the grounds of the Motion Picture House in Woodland Hills, on October 26, 1952. She was survived at the time by her brother, Sam "Deacon" McDaniel, a film actor. Thousands of mourners turned out to remember her life and accomplishments. It was her wish to be buried in the Hollywood Cemetery on Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood, along with her fellow movie stars, Douglas Fairbanks, Rudolph Valentino, and others. McDaniel wrote: "I desire a white casket and a white shroud; white gardenias in my hair and in my hands, together with a white gardenia blanket and a pillow of red roses" I also wish to be buried in the Hollywood Cemetery".[34] The owner, Jules 'Jack' Roth, refused to allow her to be interred there, because they did not take blacks. Her second choice was Rosedale Cemetery, where she lies today.[35] Since 1914, it had also been the resting place of Allen Allensworth,[36] military officer who had founded California's first and only all-black town, which is now the Colonel Allensworth State Historic Park.
    In 1999, Tyler Cassity, the new owner of the Hollywood Cemetery, who had renamed it Hollywood Forever Cemetery, wanted to right the wrong and have Miss McDaniel interred in the cemetery. Her family did not want to disturb her remains after the passage of so much time, and declined the offer. Hollywood Forever Cemetery then did the next best thing and built a large cenotaph memorial on the lawn overlooking the lake in honor of McDaniel. It is one of the most popular sites for visitors.[37]

    [edit] Will

    The "Oscar" that Hattie won was placed in the keeping of Howard University in Washington, D.C. The statue disappeared during racial unrest on the Washington, D.C., campus in the late 1960s.[38] The last will filed for probate disposed of less than $10,000 to a few relatives and friends, her estate had been eroded by medical costs.[39] She left $1 to her former husband, Larry C. Williams.[40]

    [edit] Legacy and recognition

    Hattie has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in Hollywood: one for her contributions to radio at 6933 Hollywood Boulevard, and one for motion pictures at 1719 Vine Street.[41] In 1975, she was inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame posthumously.[42]
    In 2002, the legacy of pioneering actress Hattie McDaniel is recalled when American Movie Classics (AMC) delves into her life in the film Beyond Tara, The Extraordinary Life Of Hattie McDaniel (2001), produced and directed by Madison D. Lacy, Ph.D., and hosted by Whoopi Goldberg. The one-hour special shows the struggles and triumphs of how McDaniel, in spite of racism and adversity, knocked down the doors of Hollywood and made her presence known. The film won the 2001–2002 Daytime Emmy Award, presented on May 17, 2002, for Outstanding Special Class Special.[43]
    McDaniel was featured as the 29th inductee on the Black Heritage Series by the United States Postal Service. She was the first black Oscar winner honoured with a stamp. The 39-cent stamp was released on January 29, 2006. This stamp features a 1941 photograph of McDaniel in the dress she wore on January 25, 1940.[44][45]
    The ceremony took place at the Margaret Herrick Library of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, where the Hattie McDaniel collection includes photographs of McDaniel and other family members, as well as scripts and other documents. "She was a most special lady," McDaniel's Gone with the Wind co-star Ann Rutherford told AP Television News. Rutherford recalled how McDaniel thought some of her friends looked down on her for playing a maid "But (McDaniel) said, I'd rather play a maid than be a maid", Rutherford said.[46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vamp View Post
    She was a wonderful actress. I think she made Gone With the Wind.
    I agree! She always told Miss Scarlet what she thought! And with the best attitude!

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    Thanks for posting this. I had no idea how extensive Hattie's career was.
    You can't get there from here. http://eclectech.co.uk/mindcontrol.php

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    god rest her lovely soul.

    pull the string!

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    One of my favorite character actresses. How anyone could think the role of Mammy was demeaning is beyond me: it was second only perhaps to Scarlett in complexity and and bar-none the greatest performance of the movie. (One black critic pointed out that what made the performance and by extension the scenes McD was in was that while some actresses may have tried/directors would have insisted on a "Lawz a mercy what's we gwine do!" burlesque performances, Hattie "came from a real place" and portrayed the role as a real person and with lots of nuance. (The little sly look she gives at "and I ain't exactly noticed Mr. Wilkes askin' for to marry ya" or the she reads Scarlett the riot act in a couple of scenes are perfect.) While I completely agree with her "better $700 than $7" line (and she made a lot more than $700 a week at the height of her career) it is a pity she couldn't get high paying roles that weren't "sassy servants to white folks", but there was just no studio willing to produce quality entertainment with black casts then (not that there's an overabundance now [hence the regrettable fame and fortune of the lamentably untalented Tyler Perry]).

    Some Hattie trivia picked up from various bios and articles:

    She had a ribald sense of humor and a dirty mouth when around friends. Her favorite profanity was "Well shit in my hat!"

    It's often remarked that she died broke or very near, but this is- thankfully- slightly misleading. She was actually a wealthy woman until cancer destroyed her health, at which time- knowing she would not recover- she prudently disposed of her estate by giving most of it to friends, family, and charities to avoid probate hassles and the risk of it being embezzled while she was incapacitated. This more than medical bills and illness is why she died with so little.

    Her father Henry was a survivor of the Fort Pillow massacre. He was able to flee the field before the murders took place. (For those unfamiliar, exactly what happened is heavily debated, but what's known is that several unarmed black Union troops were murdered by Confederates [the main debate is whether or not it was ordered by Nathan B. Forrest].)

    What's particularly insulting about Hollywood Cemetery's refusal to allow an Oscar winning actress to be buried there because of her color: the graves included mobster Bugsy Siegel, the dogs who played Rin Tin Tin, and the pet chimps of a millionaire buried there.

    My favorite picture of her is the one in her American Women Volunteer Services uniform. Hattie was one of the most successful bond selling celebrities in WW2 and was a huge hit whenever she visited the troops.
    Last edited by Sampiro; 07-30-2008 at 09:00 PM.

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    She was also a friend of Dorothy,how come a straight guy like me knows that?

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    What a fantastic thread dedicated to such a great lady!

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    Ive read about some rumors that talk about a romance between Hattie and Tallullah Bankhead...i wonder if thats true...
    By what ive read about her, she had no luck in love, her personal life was a mess most of the time, but she was a wonderful woman.
    I really like Hattie.

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    I loved her and agree she made GWTW a better movie. THis is great thread.
    I also didn't know of her extensive background. A good woman and a fine actress.

    RIP Hattie

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    I loved Hattie she was so good. He speech at the Oscars is one of my favorites

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    It's true hattie, after her painful divorce was into women. She and Bankhead had a wonderful affiar. Bankhead was known as a "chubby Chaser" and a female Don Juan. she also liked men.

    I wish Hattie could have been Buried at Hollywood Forever and not just a memorial set up. that was her last wish.

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    Hattie was incredible in Gone With the Wind...The movie would've been a HUGE "snoozer" if she wasn't in it. The movie is a complete "bore" when she's not in the scene.

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    Quote Originally Posted by burgtwngrl View Post
    It's true hattie, after her painful divorce was into women. She and Bankhead had a wonderful affiar. Bankhead was known as a "chubby Chaser" and a female Don Juan. she also liked men.

    I wish Hattie could have been Buried at Hollywood Forever and not just a memorial set up. that was her last wish.
    after Tyler cassity bought HFE...he contacted hattie's family and offered to have Hattie brought to HFE...her family declined and that is when the cenotaph went up.
    Last edited by SistaSara; 08-02-2008 at 10:12 AM.

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    What a phenomenal lady she was! Gone with the Wind is one of my all time favorite movies...(my daughters middle name is even Scarlett). Hattie brought a truth to the character that few actresses could and her quote about playing a maid instead of being one is priceless.
    God created liquor to keep the Irish from conquering the world!

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    When I read about how Hattie was treated in Hollywood, by her neighbours & after death, it affected me deeply. I felt disgusted, angry and tearful.

    She was SO wonderful in GWTW. She made that movie for me! (along with lovely Viv, of course)
    TINNNAAAA!!!! BRING ME THE AXE!!!!

  23. #23
    I loved her in GWTW. She was a brave and honest soul. The relationship that she had onscreen with Clark Gable was apparently the same offscreen. They were good friends. I always found it touching he refused to go to the premiere of the movie if she couldnt go but relented when persuaded by McDaniel. I'd love to find her Oscar!

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    What a wonderful Lady, I kew there was a reason I loved her. I to did not know she had done so much work. I loved her in everything she did, her and Ethel Waters.
    "A day without laughter is a day wasted." - Charlie Chaplin


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    I was thinking of Hattie and her Oscar the other night when the actress from "The Help" won. How far we've come.... and how far we haven't.
    You can't "nu uh" death. That's bad debating.

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    "Tain't fittin'" Greatest line in ANY movie..

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    GWTW gained its iconic status due to the performances of Hattie, Gable, and Leigh. All the other characters could have been cast differently with little effect on the film's endurance.
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    Quote Originally Posted by radiojane View Post
    I was thinking of Hattie and her Oscar the other night when the actress from "The Help" won. How far we've come.... and how far we haven't.
    I was, too. I have always loved me some Hattie McDaniel! Mammy to Scarlett: Oh no you ain't! If you don't care what folks says about this family, I does. And I done told you and told you, you can always tell a lady by the way she eats in front of people like a bird. And I ain't aimin' to have you go over to Mista John Wilkes' house and eat like a field hand and gobble like a hog.
    I never wanted to see anybody die, but there are a few obituary notices I have read with pleasure. ~ Clarence Darrow

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Bidmor View Post
    GWTW gained its iconic status due to the performances of Hattie, Gable, and Leigh. All the other characters could have been cast differently with little effect on the film's endurance.
    I have to add Olivia DeHaviland in there. She was wonderful.

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    Here's the actual.

    120121-P3565HattieMcDaniel.jpg

  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Bidmor View Post
    GWTW gained its iconic status due to the performances of Hattie, Gable, and Leigh. All the other characters could have been cast differently with little effect on the film's endurance.
    Are you kidding? What about Olivia de Havilland? Her role was way harder than Vivien Leigh's as Scarlet.

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Hockeywife View Post
    I have to add Olivia DeHaviland in there. She was wonderful.
    Thank you.

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    And this might come as a shock to a few readers, but as of this writing, Olivia is still with us. Can you believe that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flmlvr View Post
    And this might come as a shock to a few readers, but as of this writing, Olivia is still with us. Can you believe that?
    So is her sister Joan. She came into our hospital a year ago and looks fantastic.

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    The next time you watch GWTW, pay attention to the scene where Rhett and Mammy are toasting the birth of Bonnie Blue. As a prank, Gable switched the ice tea with Scotch...Hattie never faulters (just an slight wince you have to look for)...a true pro!
    ~The only difference between a rut and a grave is depth~

    ~~I should never have switched from Scotch to Martinis.~~ Humphrey Bogart's last words

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  38. #38
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    class act. rip hattie
    pull the string!

  39. #39
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    And this might come as a shock to a few readers, but as of this writing, Olivia is still with us. Can you believe that?

    Yes, ironic that the person whose character Melanie dies at the end of GWTW survived all other cast members except for Alicia Rhett, who played Ashley's sister India. Alicia's still alive as of this writing, she either 98 or 99. As someone once wrote of Alicia, "If you're going to appear in only one movie [such as Alicia did] it may as well be GWTW."
    Next time Turner shows Since You Went Away, watch it - Hattie's moving performance is one of the highlights of the film. Selznick was probably one of the few people in Hollywood who thought to include an African-American character as an integral part of a film about how WWII was affecting those on the homefront. Her scene towards the end (on Xmas eve putting presents under the tree - I won't say anything more, don't wanna reveal the plot too much) must've brought audiences to tears.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by burgtwngrl View Post
    It's true hattie, after her painful divorce was into women. She and Bankhead had a wonderful affiar. Bankhead was known as a "chubby Chaser" and a female Don Juan. she also liked men.

    I wish Hattie could have been Buried at Hollywood Forever and not just a memorial set up. that was her last wish.
    I don't know why but I just can't picture Tallulah and Hattie together romantically?

  41. #41
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    Never knew about her before reading this thread. I've never seen GWTW in its entirety. What a wonderful woman she sounds like!!


  42. #42
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    If anyone hasn't had the chance to view her Oscar acceptance speech, I recommend doing so. It still chokes me up to this day.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicbettie View Post
    Never knew about her before reading this thread. I've never seen GWTW in its entirety. What a wonderful woman she sounds like!!
    It's over three hours of fantastic. Try to catch it if you can. Some restored theaters across the country will offer free or very low cost showings as a way to get people to experience their newly restored theaters. And this movie is best seen on the big screen to do it justice.
    .

    Life is like a box of chocolates: unless it was sent to you by Divine.

  44. #44
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    Cool, thanks! I will look for that and check it out. I know it's a movie I should see.


  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissZoot View Post
    If anyone hasn't had the chance to view her Oscar acceptance speech, I recommend doing so. It still chokes me up to this day.
    The Strange Case Of The Missing Corpse
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-GmH8eFJFU

    Mrs. Peel (commenting on Steed's sword): "That looks a bit droopy." Steed: "Wait until it's challenged."

  46. #46
    Oh, do I adore her in GWTW. She is so real and so letter perfect as Mammy.

  47. #47
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    I heard a rumor a few years ago that
    someone threw her Oscar in some body of water.
    Last edited by theotherlondon; 02-01-2013 at 03:01 PM.
    Carolyn(1958-2009) always in my heart.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by theotherlondon View Post
    I heard a rumor a few years ago that
    someone threw her Oscar in some body of water.
    Entirely possible.

    "The "Oscar" that Hattie won was placed in the keeping of Howard University in Washington, D.C. The statue disappeared during racial unrest on the Washington, D.C., campus in the late 1960s.[38]"
    Last edited by TheWrath of MadelineKahn; 02-02-2013 at 10:30 AM.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave62 View Post
    And this might come as a shock to a few readers, but as of this writing, Olivia is still with us. Can you believe that?

    Yes, ironic that the person whose character Melanie dies at the end of GWTW survived all other cast members except for Alicia Rhett, who played Ashley's sister India. Alicia's still alive as of this writing, she either 98 or 99. As someone once wrote of Alicia, "If you're going to appear in only one movie [such as Alicia did] it may as well be GWTW."
    Next time Turner shows Since You Went Away, watch it - Hattie's moving performance is one of the highlights of the film. Selznick was probably one of the few people in Hollywood who thought to include an African-American character as an integral part of a film about how WWII was affecting those on the homefront. Her scene towards the end (on Xmas eve putting presents under the tree - I won't say anything more, don't wanna reveal the plot too much) must've brought audiences to tears.
    I've never seen Since you Went Away...thanks for the tip. It's playing on TCM on Friday, April 12 at 10:15 pm. (ET) on the USA Turner channel. I've got a reminder set up!

    Quote Originally Posted by TheWrath of MadelineKahn View Post
    Entirely possible.

    "The "Oscar" that Hattie won was placed in the keeping of Howard University in Washington, D.C. The statue disappeared during racial unrest on the Washington, D.C., campus in the late 1960s.[38]"
    Wow. Great information. I've never heard that before. That's so sad that such a historically significant piece of history is lost. Sorry if this was already mentioned, but apparently, Hattie didn't get a statuette, she (and other best supporting actors of that time) received a plaque.

    I love the wealth of infomation on FAD!
    Archer Fact: You can‚??t tourniquet the taint. (Source: Ray Gillette)

  50. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Bidmor View Post
    GWTW gained its iconic status due to the performances of Hattie, Gable, and Leigh. All the other characters could have been cast differently with little effect on the film's endurance.
    This is so true....When Alicia Rhett died I didn't know who she was.....I remember the character but not the actress....

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