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Thread: Robert Kennedy

  1. #101
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    Beautiful video showcasing what a wonderful father Bobby was.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MH_B_pMzl68
    Too often we excuse those who are willing to build their own lives on the shattered dreams of other human beings.

    -Robert F. Kennedy


  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by DJ's_Hub-Hag View Post
    I read a lot of books about Robert Kennedy, many of which had very strong evidence of a conspiracy to kill RFK ("RFK Must Die" is the one that comes to mind) and that Sirhan Sirhan was actually under hynosis when he was shooting Kennedy--a patsy to take the blame. This also can explain why Sirhan keep shooting shot after shot and the gun had to be wrestled out of his hand. After reading the book, I believe that there was indeed another gunman; someone that stayed very close to Kennedy that night and was behind Kennedy when he was shot behind the ear. The writer of the book strongly feels (and I'm convinced as well) that this was a man in a goldenrod sweater of Arab descent that had a gun disguised as a camera. After the assassination, this man, who was present in photos and on the film of the short congratulatory speech at the Ambassador Hotel close to and often behind Kennedy, disappeared and could not be found.
    ditto. RFK must die is a great book as well. I have two shelves in my bookcase(s) that is devoted to Kennedy genre. You would think me a library! I, personally, thought that it was a difficult read bc of the author (he tends to ramble) but a lot of interesting facts.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Two Lost Souls View Post
    Beautiful video showcasing what a wonderful father Bobby was.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MH_B_pMzl68
    Aww, thank you for posting that, I enjoyed it. He is a fascinating man to look at....some profiles I think he looks like Jack, other times he looks like Teddy, but then other views he looks 100% Bobby. I find him more intriguing than Jack and I can't figure out why.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamiele View Post
    Aww, thank you for posting that, I enjoyed it. He is a fascinating man to look at....some profiles I think he looks like Jack, other times he looks like Teddy, but then other views he looks 100% Bobby. I find him more intriguing than Jack and I can't figure out why.
    I agree with everything you said. When I watch video's of him, I always try to figure out what he would have looked like old...and depending on the angle, he looks a bit like Ted. So, maybe he'd look like Ted, but thinner/smaller.

    I find him far more fascinating then JFK. Bobby just seemd like a great guy, with a huge heart and he carried that over to politics, but at the same time he was fierce in his believes. And most importantly, he was a great father.
    Too often we excuse those who are willing to build their own lives on the shattered dreams of other human beings.

    -Robert F. Kennedy


  5. #105
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    Keeping with the father theme, here's a video of Bobby with his son, David. It's a beautiful video. I have to admit, this one actually made me tear up, something I rarely do!

    Bobby and David were very close and alot alike. David never really got over the death of his father...very sad story.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vjjAebR768
    Too often we excuse those who are willing to build their own lives on the shattered dreams of other human beings.

    -Robert F. Kennedy


  6. #106
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    Joseph Kennedy Nixes Senate Campaign

    BOSTON -- Former Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy II, the eldest son of Robert F. Kennedy, announced Monday he would not run for the U.S. Senate seat held for nearly 50 years by his late uncle, Edward M. Kennedy.

    In a statement, the former six-term congressman said he cares about those seeking decent housing, fair wages and health care. But he added, "The best way for me to contribute to those causes is by continuing my work at Citizens Energy Corp."

    The nonprofit organization provides free heating oil to the poor, but Kennedy likely would have faced campaign questions about fuel it received from Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez - a persistent U.S. critic.

    Yet Kennedy also may have garnered support from the legions of Massachusetts Democrats who long supported his uncle, as well as national followers of his father, who was a U.S. senator from New York when he was assassinated in June 1968 as he sought the Democratic presidential nomination.

    "My father called politics an honorable profession, and I have profound respect for those who choose to advance the causes of social and economic justice in elective office," the 56-year-old Kennedy said.

    The decision is expected to widen the field of announced candidates for the late senator's seat. It became vacant Aug. 25, when Edward Kennedy died of brain cancer at age 77.

    Three veteran Massachusetts congressmen - Reps. Michael Capuano, Edward J. Markey and John Tierney - have said they are considering campaigns but would not run against a member of the Kennedy family. The senator's widow, Vicki, had previously ruled out a campaign.

    In a fiery speech Monday morning to a Boston labor breakfast, Capuano sought to distinguish himself from unnamed competitors.

    "Everybody loves you today," the congressman told a crowd of about 400, including Tierney and Markey. "Everybody's for prevailing wage, everybody's for (project-labor agreements), everybody's for this, that and the other thing. Me too. That's good. But when it comes time to make the tough decisions, that's when you start to figure who's with you and who's not."

    Markey said before addressing the crowd that he was still weighing a race, highlighting his stature as a 33-year member of the House, honorary title as dean of the New England delegation and chairmanship of the House Select Committee for Energy Independence.

    "And I have to weigh that in balancing it against how effective I can be as a senator," he said. "But I will not consider it unless Joe Kennedy does not run."

    Former Rep. Martin Meehan, who is now chancellor of the University of Massachusetts-Lowell but still has nearly $5 million in his campaign account, had also said he would defer to Kennedy, but he has been lukewarm about a campaign even if Kennedy declined to run.

    Another Democrat, Rep. Stephen Lynch, said at the breakfast it's "likely" he will be announcing his candidacy during the next week. The former ironworker, who lives in blue-collar South Boston, said he wanted to wait until after Labor Day.

    "I probably won't fit in in the U.S. Senate, but, I think that, in a lot of cases, the people of Massachusetts don't want a senator to fit in. They want them to stand out, and I offer through my experience," Lynch said.

    Lynch recalled twice being laid off from shipbuilding and automaking jobs, adding, "I share the experience that a lot of others are feeling right now."

    Attorney General Martha Coakley became the first high-profile Democrat to declare for the seat when she announced her candidacy last week. She wasted little time in flexing her political muscle.

    Her supporters lined city intersections for two blocks around the hotel hosting the Greater Boston Labor Council breakfast, testifying to her early organizational advantage in the 90-day sprint to the primary election.

    "We're off and running," she said as she shook hands outside.

    Coakley said she has been especially pleased with her fundraising since her announcement speech last Thursday, though she was not sure precisely how close she is to her goal of raising $1 million during the first two weeks of her candidacy.

    "I knew we'd be able to raise the money," she said. "Now I know we will."

    One prominent Republican, former Lt. Gov. Kerry Healey, announced Sunday she would not run. But state Sen. Scott Brown said he is formally "testing the waters" under federal election law. That provision allows him to raise and spend up to $5,000 assessing a campaign. He expects to announce a decision Thursday or Friday.

    The 16-year municipal and state official has also been in the military for 29 years, most recently in the Massachusetts National Guard as a lieutenant colonel in the Judge Advocate General's Corps. His eldest daughter, Ayla, gained national prominence in 2006 as a Hollywood finalist on TV's "American Idol."

    "There's a guy in the White House who's cut a somewhat similar path: He was a state senator, a U.S. senator and now he's president," Brown said in an interview.

    http://www.ktla.com/news/landing/ktl...,2562986.story

  7. #107
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    ^I suppose that's for the best. These days, he could probably get more done being an activist, then a Senator! lol

    I'd love to see Robert, Jr. run for some type of political office, though. I've watched some of his speeches, and I liked what I heard from him. Some of the things he said and the way he delivered them, reminded me alot of his father.
    Too often we excuse those who are willing to build their own lives on the shattered dreams of other human beings.

    -Robert F. Kennedy


  8. #108
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    Anyone know of any websites that talk about Bobby and Ethel's marriage? I never really see much written about their relationship.
    Too often we excuse those who are willing to build their own lives on the shattered dreams of other human beings.

    -Robert F. Kennedy


  9. #109
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    Wanted to bump because he would have been 84 today. So, Happy Birthday to Bobby.
    Too often we excuse those who are willing to build their own lives on the shattered dreams of other human beings.

    -Robert F. Kennedy


  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelbons View Post
    I swear I've seen autopsy pics of RFK. Not sure where... maybe the Autopsy/Dr. Baden show that was on HBO?

    Here's the only one I can find...
    This can't be R.F.K, this guy has facial hair..look at his chin!

  11. #111
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    LAPD were going to display RFK's bloody clothes from the June 5/68 assassination but they have changed their minds after numerous complaints:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1255171/Los-Angeles-police-forced-apologise-exhibition-bloodstained-clothes-worn-Robert-Kennedy-shot.html
    Last edited by cash; 03-03-2010 at 07:50 PM.

  12. #112
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    Bobby Kennedy died!?!?!?!

    j/k...

  13. #113
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    Interesting letter by one of Bobby's sons concerning the exhibit:


    Opinion
    Personal effects

    Putting the blood-soaked clothing of my father, Robert F. Kennedy, on display was a macabre publicity stunt.

    By Maxwell Taylor Kennedy March 3, 2010 | 4:40 p.m.



    I am the son of Robert F. Kennedy, who was murdered in Los Angeles more than 40 years ago. As the child of a crime victim, I am guaranteed by the state Constitution that my family and I will be treated with respect and dignity.

    Yet I was horrified to learn earlier this week that the Los Angeles Police Department had included the shirt, tie and jacket my father was wearing when he was assassinated in an exhibition at the California Homicide Investigators Assn. conference in Las Vegas. The display -- billed as never-before-seen artifacts from the vaults of the LAPD and the L.A. County district attorney's office -- also includes crime-scene evidence from the Black Dahlia murder, the death of Marilyn Monroe, the O.J. Simpson case and the Manson murders.

    As a former assistant district attorney, I understand that the proper storage of property and legal evidence is a critical part of the judicial process. The D.A.'s office and the police are required to follow legislative and court-ordered guidelines, because the correct handling of crime victims' property minimizes the risk of evidence contamination and protects it for return to owners.

    I requested the return of my father's items nearly a decade ago. My request was refused by the district attorney's office. The D.A. promised, though, to keep the personal items with care and out of public view. Since then, courageous crime victims in California have forced a change in the state Constitution, requiring law enforcement officials to return victims' property when it is no longer needed as evidence.

    This week, despite that constitutional requirement, the chief of police and the district attorney took my father's blood-soaked clothing and displayed it, as part of a macabre publicity stunt. It is almost incomprehensible to imagine what circumstances would have led to a decision to transport these items across state lines to be gawked at by gamblers and tourists. It is demeaning to my family, but just as important, it is demeaning to the trust that citizens place in their law enforcement officers.

    When I called to express my surprise and disappointment, the chief maintained to me that hanging my dad's bloody shirt from a mannequin in a casino was part of an effort to train detectives. Perhaps he believes that, but to me it seems like a cheap bid for attention. It is almost like a traffic cop inviting motorists to slow down and take a good look as they go past a tragedy.

    The chief agreed to remove my father's belongings from the exhibit. I'm pleased he did so. But he should also remember that such items are personal property, entrusted to the state's care, not to be exploited. He relies on crime victims to prosecute virtually every criminal. He cannot long succeed if he continues to put victims' pain on display for publicity.

    Maxwell Taylor Kennedy, an author, is a resident of Los Angeles.

    Copyright 2010, The Los Angeles Times

  14. #114
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    Maybe they should dig deeper in the tickle trunk and see if JFK's brain got put in there by mistake?!

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    Quote Originally Posted by kaseyko1 View Post
    Interesting letter by one of Bobby's sons concerning the exhibit:


    Opinion
    Personal effects

    Putting the blood-soaked clothing of my father, Robert F. Kennedy, on display was a macabre publicity stunt.

    By Maxwell Taylor Kennedy March 3, 2010 | 4:40 p.m.



    I am the son of Robert F. Kennedy, who was murdered in Los Angeles more than 40 years ago. As the child of a crime victim, I am guaranteed by the state Constitution that my family and I will be treated with respect and dignity.

    Yet I was horrified to learn earlier this week that the Los Angeles Police Department had included the shirt, tie and jacket my father was wearing when he was assassinated in an exhibition at the California Homicide Investigators Assn. conference in Las Vegas. The display -- billed as never-before-seen artifacts from the vaults of the LAPD and the L.A. County district attorney's office -- also includes crime-scene evidence from the Black Dahlia murder, the death of Marilyn Monroe, the O.J. Simpson case and the Manson murders.

    As a former assistant district attorney, I understand that the proper storage of property and legal evidence is a critical part of the judicial process. The D.A.'s office and the police are required to follow legislative and court-ordered guidelines, because the correct handling of crime victims' property minimizes the risk of evidence contamination and protects it for return to owners.

    I requested the return of my father's items nearly a decade ago. My request was refused by the district attorney's office. The D.A. promised, though, to keep the personal items with care and out of public view. Since then, courageous crime victims in California have forced a change in the state Constitution, requiring law enforcement officials to return victims' property when it is no longer needed as evidence.

    This week, despite that constitutional requirement, the chief of police and the district attorney took my father's blood-soaked clothing and displayed it, as part of a macabre publicity stunt. It is almost incomprehensible to imagine what circumstances would have led to a decision to transport these items across state lines to be gawked at by gamblers and tourists. It is demeaning to my family, but just as important, it is demeaning to the trust that citizens place in their law enforcement officers.

    When I called to express my surprise and disappointment, the chief maintained to me that hanging my dad's bloody shirt from a mannequin in a casino was part of an effort to train detectives. Perhaps he believes that, but to me it seems like a cheap bid for attention. It is almost like a traffic cop inviting motorists to slow down and take a good look as they go past a tragedy.

    The chief agreed to remove my father's belongings from the exhibit. I'm pleased he did so. But he should also remember that such items are personal property, entrusted to the state's care, not to be exploited. He relies on crime victims to prosecute virtually every criminal. He cannot long succeed if he continues to put victims' pain on display for publicity.

    Maxwell Taylor Kennedy, an author, is a resident of Los Angeles.

    Copyright 2010, The Los Angeles Times
    I agree with him.

  16. #116
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    I think Max Kennedy has every right to be upset. Actually he was lied to when they agreed they could not return the artifacts but it would never be displayed. Anyone else would be suing The DA at this point. If one of my loved ones was brutally murdered its uncomprhensible to imagine someone displaying the Clothing without permission from the family.

  17. #117
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    It's hard to believe Bobby was assassinated 42 years ago. I think the world would have been a much better place had he been in it. *Sigh*

    It's interesting to note that Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. has been the first environmental lawyer to file a civil lawsuit against BP for the oil spill in the gulf (other than the Justice Dept starting an investigation). It'll be interesting to see how this case proceeds & perhaps some new environmental laws can be enacted, or current ones structured with more oversight requirements. After all, he is the sr. attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Counsel organization. I think his father would be proud of him. He's done an awful lot for environmental causes.

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    It had been a long time since I'd read about the events surrounding RFK's murder when I read an article about it on Crimelibrary.com. Very interesting case for a second shooter in the pantry.

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    I've not heard of a good explanation yet as to how the gunpowder was on the back of Kennedy's head, but yet Sirhan Sirhan was directly in front of Kennedy when the shooting took place. Another interesting thing is that the security guard, Caesar, was directly behind Kennedy & the next day sold his weapon that he had at the time of the shooting. It was also established that Caesar had mob ties.

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    A sad anniversary of a major tragedy. No matter what actually happened, it is so hard to grasp that a single, simple man could have so easily ended the life of someone so full of promise. I really think RFK would have made a great president.

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    Nov 20, 2010 would have been Bobby Kennedys 85th birthday. This is a very powerful and moving News Story on the Bus Boy, famous in the picture kneeling next to his hero as he layed mortally wounded on the Kitchen Floor of the famous Hotel. He went to visit RFK's Grave this past week on what would have been RFK"s 85th Birthday.






    Kneeling again next to RFK

    Juan Romero, a busboy at the Ambassador Hotel, crouches beside the mortally wounded Robert F. Kennedy on June 5, 1968. On Saturday, on what would have been Kennedy's 85th birthday, Romero visited the slain senator's grave site at Arlington National Cemetery. (Boris Yaro, Los Angeles Times / November 21, 2010)





    In 1968, 17-year-old busboy Juan Romero held Robert Kennedy's hand as the senator lay dying at the Ambassador Hotel. On what would have been RFK's 85th birthday, Romero visits his grave at Arlington National Cemetery.

    By Steve Lopez November 21,2010


    Reporting from Arlington, Va.
    As a skinny teenage busboy, Juan Romero knelt beside a mortally wounded Bobby Kennedy at the Ambassador Hotel. On Saturday morning, more than 42 years later, he knelt again, this time beside RFK's grave on what would have been Kennedy's 85th birthday.

    Romero was wearing a suit for the first time in his life, saying it was the proper way to show his respect for a man whose memory he has tried to honor by living a life of tolerance and humility.

    Getting up the courage to visit Arlington National Cemetery was not easy for Romero, a construction worker from San Jose who has been haunted for decades by the events of June 5, 1968. Under a soft blue sky, with fall colors exploding across the velvety slopes of the cemetery, Romero walked off to be alone and have one last good cry before visiting the grave.

    "Sorry," he apologized to his daughter, Elda, and friend, Rigo Chacon, who had made the trip with him from California. "If I can get it out of the way now...." Maybe a good cry would help him keep his composure, he said, when he finally stood at the grave.

    I first wrote about Romero in 1998, on the 30th anniversary of the RFK assassination, and was struck by his decency and spirit of goodwill. For years, he had avoided talking about his small part in a national tragedy, but he came to believe it was his duty to speak up about his own take on Kennedy's legacy, in part because hatred and small-mindedness often pollute the national conversation.

    Romero's family moved to California from Mexico when he was 10. He lived in projects for a while and might have gotten caught up in the gang life except that his stepfather yanked him out of that world and helped get him a job at the Ambassador Hotel.

    When Kennedy called for room service a few nights before the California primary, Romero paid off another busboy for the privilege of delivering his food. Even though he was just 17, Romero knew that RFK was a man of empathy who had walked with Cesar Chavez, and he felt more accepted as an immigrant — more American — just knowing that Kennedy might become president.

    When Kennedy shook Romero's hand, in the presidential suite, Juan was transformed. In that firm grip, he felt appreciated, he felt whole, he felt like a man. Two nights later, when Kennedy won the primary, Juan raced to the Ambassador pantry and shook RFK's hand again as the candidate went to deliver his victory speech.

    After the speech, Romero pressed through the crowd again, his pride swelling. Once more, he shook Kennedy's hand. And then came the gunshot. Four and a half years after the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and two months after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., Bobby lay dying from an assassin's bullet.

    He was shot while holding Romero's hand.

    At Arlington on Saturday, Romero, now 60, walked slowly. His chest was tight and his shoulders stiff as he made his way toward the simple, small white cross that marks RFK's grave. He had wept the night before as he anticipated this moment, telling me how he had refused to wash Kennedy's dried blood off his hand.

    On the day after the shooting, as he was sitting on the bus on the way to Roosevelt High, a woman, reading the Los Angeles Times, looked at a picture in the paper of a young busboy in a crisp white uniform, a mask of disbelief on his face as he tried to help Kennedy up off the floor.

    "This is you," the woman said to him, and Romero looked away in horror.

    Forty-two years later, as Romero approached the grave, his friend Chacon stood at a respectful distance, knowing Romero had to do this in his own way. Chacon, a retired TV newsman, had seen Romero break down many times over the years as he relived the trauma. Chacon had finally suggested he visit Arlington for the sake of his own healing.

    Romero holds himself at least partly responsible for Kennedy's death, and in his private moment with Kennedy now, he wanted to ask forgiveness. If he hadn't been so intent on shaking Kennedy's hand, he told me, he might have seen and stopped the assassin. He would have taken the bullet himself, he said, if Kennedy could have been spared.

    I told Romero it's time he let go of the guilt. RFK, a man of peace, was killed by Sirhan Sirhan, a man of violence and rage. There's no way to make sense of that, but I urged him to listen to his buddy, Chacon, who reminds him that in a moment of tragedy, Juan did a humane thing. He didn't run, he didn't take cover. He tried to help, thinking perhaps that Kennedy had merely been pushed out of harm's way and hit his head on the concrete. When the young busboy realized the situation was grave, he took his own rosary beads out of his shirt pocket, twisted them around Kennedy's hand and prayed for him.

    On Saturday, Romero stood silently over the cross, his hands clasped, staring down at the small gravestone. He spoke softly, telling Kennedy how much he loved his country and tried to honor the ideals Kennedy preached.

    Bobby Kennedy was a complicated man who had many critics on both the left and the right. But as Romero knelt at the grave and broke down once more, it was for the Kennedy he knew, the one whose words are engraved on a wall near his resting place:

    "What we need in the United States is not division … not hatred … not violence or unlawfulness, but love and wisdom and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country.... Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to take the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world...."

    Romero walked away from the grave with perhaps a small piece of his burden lifted. He briefly toured the graves of John and Ted Kennedy, guided by Rep. Mike Honda (D-San Jose) and Rep. Patrick Kennedy (D-R.I.), the son of Ted. Talking, however briefly, to a Kennedy about RFK's commitment to social justice seemed to help Romero find some peace.

    "It's hard to say goodbye," Romero said before leaving Arlington. But clearly he was pleased that he had knelt, once more, beside Bobby Kennedy. "I want him to know he's remembered."

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    I was about to post that, Nicki, if someone else hadn't.

    I also read that the folks at Arlington National Cemetery didn't know about RFK's birthday; he informed a guide at the cemetery about it.

    Another photo from the assassination.

    We all march to a different drumbeat



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    Thanks for the pic, bluerose. You can see Juan's rosary in RFK's hand. Juan was a very brave boy. I'm sorry that he's felt guilty for so many years. I hope the visit helped him heal.

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    Sirhan looks like the guy from Monk:
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

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    And Sirhan Sirhan was scolded by the parole board for not attending enough AA meetings in prison.

    He drank several Tom Collins prior to shooting RFK.

    Priorities ...
    I think gay marriage is something that should be between a man and a woman ... Arnold Schwarzenegger

  28. #128

    4/28/11 - Sirhan says girl manipulated him

    Story Here: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/04/28...est=latestnews

    He says he thought that after a shoulder touch or pinch, he was on a gun range and that the girl in the polka dot dress actually shot RFK.

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    Bump!

    Tomorrow it will be 43 years since the assassination. I think Bobby would have changed the world had he lived.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveBug View Post
    Bump!

    Tomorrow it will be 43 years since the assassination. I think Bobby would have changed the world had he lived.

    And that is why he was killed. To prevent that change.


    "I will be buried in a spring loaded casket filled with confetti, and a future archaeologist will have one awesome day at work."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miho View Post
    And that is why he was killed. To prevent that change.
    IMO the Mob was behind it. RFK wanted to eradicate them and they eradicated him first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miho View Post
    And that is why he was killed. To prevent that change.
    I totally agree. To quote Kennedy from one of his speeches;


    Few men are willing to brave the disapproval of their fellows, the censure of their colleagues, the wrath of their society. Moral courage is a rarer commodity than bravery in battle or great intelligence. Yet it is the one essential, vital quality of those who seek to change a world which yields most painfully to change

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    nice color video of RFK's funeral and burial June 8/68

    http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=45302

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    I don't buy the mob doing it. For all of Bobby's talk, not much was really done to affect the mob too much. Bobby was more of a pain in the ass to them and not worth killing because of the heat it would have brought. It wasn't until the 80's that they really got serious on the mob IMHO.

    The furor over the Palestine / Israel situation at the time must not be discounted. It was really explosive and I can believe that the Americans backing the Israelis over the Palestinians was enough to set Sirhan off. After this the PLO got into the swing of things and we know how bad that was.
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    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow...160638113.html


    Sirhan Sirhan seeks release from prison, alleges conspiracy theory.

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    Quote Originally Posted by slingshot View Post
    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow...160638113.html


    Sirhan Sirhan seeks release from prison, alleges conspiracy theory.
    Yeah, yeah, yeah. His defense sounds like something concocted by Dean Koontz. I guess he's tire of being in prison; well, I guess RFK's fam is tired of him being dead too.

  37. #137
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    Here's the CNN story: http://edition.cnn.com/2011/11/26/ju...rfk/index.html

    Curious. CNN reports that Sirhan's attorney, William F. Pepper, says that medical evidence shows RFK was struck by bullets from behind while Sirhan, according to witnesses, was standing directly in front of Kennedy when firing before bystanders wrestled Sirhan's shooting hand away from Kennedy's direction. Where's Arlen Specter when you need him? Well the fatal bullet was not introduced as evidence in the trial as evidence exhibit but "one just like it" was, so I guess that's good enough.
    Last edited by Bidmor; 11-29-2011 at 10:43 AM.
    The Strange Case Of The Missing Corpse
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-GmH8eFJFU

    Mrs. Peel (commenting on Steed's sword): "That looks a bit droopy." Steed: "Wait until it's challenged."

  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bidmor View Post
    Here's the CNN story: http://edition.cnn.com/2011/11/26/ju...rfk/index.html

    Curious. CNN reports that Sirhan's attorney, William F. Pepper, says that medical evidence shows RFK was struck by bullets from behind while Sirhan, according to witnesses, was standing directly in front of Kennedy when firing before bystanders wrestled Sirhan's shooting hand away from Kennedy's direction. Where's Arlen Specter when you need him? Well the fatal bullet was not introduced as evidence in the trial as evidence exhibit but "one just like it" was, so I guess that's good enough.
    Roll the tape, it's there for all to see.
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  39. #139
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    I try not to be that conspiracy whacko, but this is one thing that never sat well with me. In the span of seven years three political leaders were killed. All wanted to increase civil rights and were progressive in their thinking. Never before has that happened in this country and not since. Coincidence? IDK, but part of me feels that the government didn't want these equal rights and were willing to kill to keep the status qua. IMHO Civil Rights would have become something much more than it ended up becoming if these men had lived.


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  40. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miho View Post
    I try not to be that conspiracy whacko, but this is one thing that never sat well with me. In the span of seven years three political leaders were killed. All wanted to increase civil rights and were progressive in their thinking. Never before has that happened in this country and not since. Coincidence? IDK, but part of me feels that the government didn't want these equal rights and were willing to kill to keep the status qua. IMHO Civil Rights would have become something much more than it ended up becoming if these men had lived.
    Works for me.

  41. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miho View Post
    I try not to be that conspiracy whacko, but this is one thing that never sat well with me. In the span of seven years three political leaders were killed. All wanted to increase civil rights and were progressive in their thinking. Never before has that happened in this country and not since. Coincidence? IDK, but part of me feels that the government didn't want these equal rights and were willing to kill to keep the status qua. IMHO Civil Rights would have become something much more than it ended up becoming if these men had lived.
    YES!! I agree. You are 100% correct. I often wonder, had these men lived, what our country would be like today.
    "Dark clouds looming above the earth
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  42. #142
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    I don't buy the suppression of advancement of civil rights as a motive. In RFK's case, it was a simple case of preventing exposure. You know that Bobby either knew who and why his brother was hit or he had a pretty damn good idea. The same group of people who had JFK killed, of course, could never allow Bobby to gain the presidency. So this same group had Bobby taken out. JFK's murder was a coup and his brother was a serious threat to them. To label "them", I'd say Eisenhower's label works as good as any..."military-industrial complex".
    The Strange Case Of The Missing Corpse
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-GmH8eFJFU

    Mrs. Peel (commenting on Steed's sword): "That looks a bit droopy." Steed: "Wait until it's challenged."

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  44. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miho View Post
    IMHO Civil Rights would have become something much more than it ended up becoming if these men had lived.
    How so?

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    I don't know if this is already posted here but it should be. The best eulogy I've ever seen and one of the best speeches of the century. It's Ted Kennedy's eulogy for Bobby. It really is beautiful.


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    I remember seeing the funeral live and choking back tears.

    http://www.kennedy-web.com/ethel.htm

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    Last edited by cindyt; 11-02-2014 at 08:47 PM.

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    Why do we have forum rule 7 about excessive copy and paste, some of you may be wondering. Because the copyright holder could sue Scott for our (as in the membership here as a whole) disregard of that rule. And no member here who enjoys being a part of this forum Scott provides for us would want that.
    .

    Life goes on.

  49. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by SomeChick View Post
    Why do we have forum rule 7 about excessive copy and paste, some of you may be wondering. Because the copyright holder could sue Scott for our (as in the membership here as a whole) disregard of that rule. And no member here who enjoys being a part of this forum Scott provides for us would want that.
    Not to mention what's being plagiarized is complete conspiracy theory bullshit made up to sell books. Just my opinion but since this thread is titled "Robert Kennedy" it should be about, you know, Robert Kennedy. The man. Not saturated with horseshit conspiracy theories alleviating Sirhan of responsibility. Has the Manchurian Candidate theory been typed here yet? Bleh. I'm not bashing anyone. Just giving my opinion. Back on track to what I personally think the thread should be about.... if this hasn't been posted it should have been. It's a speech Bobby gave announcing the death of Martin Luthor King Jr. in Indianapolis. No teleprompter. No reading from notes. Just speaking and doing something we don't see anymore... being authentic. In virtually every major American city there some sort of unrest, riot, and/or violence over the King assassination. With the exception of Indianapolis. Some may say coincidence, but I think a lot of that was due to RFK and this speech. Enjoy. My God I wish he had been President.


  50. #150
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    an article on the busboy Juan Romero who is now 65 years of age

    http://www.latimes.com/local/califor...29-column.html


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