Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Stonewall Riots

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Antonio
    Posts
    1,335

    Question Stonewall Riots

    Heard this ( briefly ) mentioned in a docu I was watching a few nights ago - any New Yorkers know more?
    http://manhattan.about.com/od/glbtsc...ewallriots.htm

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    DC
    Posts
    3,928
    I've heard that it was a sleazy little dive bar owned by the mob and the police were usually paid off to do nothing. There are other websites that give the information of who didn't get paid off that night or how things went wrong. But the mob definitely owned it. As a matter of fact, I think they may still own quite a few gay bars. As far as I know, it had nothing to do with anti-gay. More like anti-pay.


    Last edited by Long Gone Day; 03-22-2009 at 04:52 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    15,117
    anti pay - hahahaha

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,441

    Wink I was at the Stonewall June 27 2009

    I was at the Stonewall yesterday, I've always wanted to go there before I leave this mortal coil!? Lol!! I went on a bus trip to see the sights and sounds of the city and went to the village to see the place where Equality was born. I went inside and even had a drink at the bar. Gin and tonic with a twist of lime. I even bought a shirt there celebrating the 40th anniversary of the uprising.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    18,396
    Saw a documentary on this last night. There is a sculpture over the road that signifies the event.
    I am a sick puppy....woof woof!!!

    Carping the living shit out of the Diem. - Me!!
    http://www.pinterest.com/neilmpenny

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,441

    Gay rights movement: 40 years since Stonewall riots

    Forty years ago, a New York City bar called the Stonewall Inn shot to global attention when its gay clientele staged a revolt against police harassment, launching the US homosexual rights movement.
    The popular bar in the Greenwich Village community gave its name to the spontaneous uprising that rocked the neighbourhood for five consecutive nights, as homosexuals fought back against police raids targeting gay-friendly establishments.
    "Stonewall was a surprise -- it was a surprise to everyone that participated, as much as it was a surprise to the city," said Martin Boyce, who back then was a 16 year-old participant in the riots.
    Raids on gay bars were commonplace then, but by the time police stormed the Stonewall Inn in the early hours of June 28, 1969, beleaguered members of New York's homosexual community had had enough.
    "When the police tried to disperse us we came in on them -- and the time had come for it," Boyce told AFP.
    As the raid continued inside the bar, a crowd gathered on the street outside and tensions -- already at a near boiling point between the city's gay community and police -- overflowed.
    "This was our street, it was the street where we were safe on," Boyce told AFP.
    "This was never a riot against straight people, this was a riot against the police, which caused us so much sorrow, but led to this movement."
    Observers and participants looking back said in hindsight the riots, involving about 200 mostly young gays, among them drag queens and lesbians, should have been no surprise, given the anti-authoritarian mood of the era.
    At the time, they note, revolution was all the rage, including the 1968 student protests, the Black Power Movement, demonstrations against the Vietnam War and the hippie counter-culture movement.
    "There was a general dislike of the police -- even in the straight world," said Robert Bryan, 63, another veteran of the uprising.
    "Hippies and Black Panthers hated the police, so we were sort of joining this feeling.
    "It was a revolutionary feeling against the establishment and against the police -- looking for more freedom to be whoever we were," said Bryan, who at the time worked for a bank, before finding work in the fashion industry.
    He said the raid quickly evolved into a pitched battle between police inside the bar and scores of protesters who gathered outside of it.
    "It was Friday night so everybody was out, and one thing led to another. Things just got out of control," Bryan told AFP.
    "I arrived not long before things started to get violent that night. People were in a very festive mood, there were laughing and making fun of the police and one thing led into another," he said.
    Before long, Bryan continued, "I was digging up stones from around the parking meters and hurling them at Stonewall. Someone tried to set The Stonewall on fire at some point and the police who were inside came out and dragged in people from the crowd and beat them."
    In the end, 13 people were arrested and four police injured that night, according to press accounts. Police battled gay demonstrators over the four ensuing nights with equal ferocity.
    But the uprising gave rise to the gay pride movement that still marks the anniversary every year with a parade down Fifth Avenue, on what has come to be known as Gay Pride Day.
    This Sunday's parade, on the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, is one of several events planned to mark the Stonewall anniversary.
    Among other events -- an recent exhibition about the riots was held at the New York Public Library, and a documentary film is scheduled to air next year on public television stations.
    David Carter, author of one of the definitive works about the uprising, "Stonewall: The Riots that Sparkled the Gay Revolution," said America's gay pride movement advanced only in fits and starts until Stonewall, which helped forge a sense of gay outrage and identity.
    "Here in the United States there were organized, ongoing political movements since 1950. But the movement did not have much success, mainly because it never became a mass movement," he said.
    "Stonewall changed a small movement into a mass movement and therefore put it forever on the map of American politics."
    Bryan said many things have changed since then, not least the atmosphere.
    "Now there are gay bars all over the place and people can go anywhere and do anything, but still it is not as crazy, as it was then," he told AFP.
    "Down there in Christopher Street there were trucks that were parked under the west side highway, and hundreds and hundreds of people would go down to these trucks that were left open, and it was a wild orgy. There is nothing like that now."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,441
    In the early hours of 28 June 1969 a relatively unassuming gay bar in the West Village of Manhattan became the epicentre of an event that changed the course of gay history.
    The Stonewall Inn, like most other gay bars during the 1960s, was frequently targeted by the police on the spurious grounds of checking for alcohol law violations and other transgressions.
    What in many cases actually occurred was police intimidation and demands for payoffs, dubbed “gayola”, in return for not arresting or publishing the names of the patrons.
    The Stonewall Inn, it must be said, did have its fair share of Mafia connections and questionable drinks policies. However, on the night of 27th, those breaches were eclipsed by the dramatic turn in events.
    Instead of complying with the police, drinkers in the bar started to resist.
    Shouts of “Gay Power” began to erupt in the street outside. Customers started throwing coins, bottles and other missiles at the police.
    The lesbians and drag queens defied the intimidation, choosing to instead linger in the doorway, whipping up the crowd. Fires were started.
    According to Craig Rodwell, quoted in an article by Lionel Wright, "A number of incidents were happening simultaneously. There was no one thing that happened or one person, there was just… a flash of group, of mass anger."
    As news of the fracas spread across the city, the group of angry demonstrators swelled, until the police were forced to take refuge in the empty bar.
    "I had been in combat situations,” Detective Inspector Pine is quoted by Wright as saying. “But there was never any time that I felt more scared than then."
    The crowd, which was made up of all shades of the LGBT community, flocked to Christopher Street to take part in this revolutionary act of defiance.
    Although the police, backed up the Tactical Patrol Force, tried several times to break up the crowd, they were outwitted by rioters who would simply disperse, regroup and attack from a different direction.
    The violence in Greenwich continued for more than three nights, with members of the LGBT using the riots as an opportunity to distribute leaflets and information.
    And so, it is argued, the Gay Liberation Movement was born.
    The Gay Liberation Front in America was formed in the wake of the riots to protest against the social oppression of the LGBT community.
    As Michael Adams, the Executive Director of Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders, said: “In the early days of the modern LGBT movement, the Gay Liberation Front was one of the most visible and vocal organisations promoting equality for the LGBT community.”
    Similar movements were established in Canada, France, Britain, Germany, Belgium, Holland, Australia, and New Zealand.
    So, why were the Stonewall Riots such a turning point? And why did they occur?
    Many historians and journalists have pointed out that during the 1960s the whole social climate was changing. The Vietnam War had radicalised the American youth.
    As young men went off to war many became involved in homosexual relationships, while back in the States there was, according to Wright, an “opening-up of U.S. Society” that could not quite be quashed.
    The black civil rights movement was gaining ground, French students had gone on strike the year before, the Communist Party had campaigned for gay rights and returning servicepeople had stayed in port cities like Manhattan.
    Craig Rodwell is quoted as saying: "There was a very volatile active political feeling, especially among young people … when the night of the Stonewall Riots came along, just everything came together at that one moment… There was no one thing special about it. It was just everything coming together, one of those moments in history that if you were there, you knew, this is it, this is what we've been waiting for."
    Forty years on from the Stonewall Riots, the global LGBT community still faces significant problems. In many South Asian and Middle Eastern countries homosexuality is still illegal; still, in theory, punishable by death.
    In Western Europe and America, the campaign for full and equal marriage rights continues. Anti-gay bullying is still prevalent in schools and in workplaces and homophobia in all its manifestations is still being fought across the world.
    And yet, for many, those dramatic riots in Greenwich forty years ago, hailed a new era in the fight for gay rights. Gay liberation began in 1969

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,441

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,441

    Proud (40th Anniversary of the Stonewall Riots)


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    San Antonio
    Posts
    30,699
    Heres an interesting precursor to Stonewall.
    The Comptons Cafeteria Riot, 1966:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compton%27s_Cafeteria_Riot

    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    San Antonio
    Posts
    30,699
    A very condescending (but somewhat funny) article about the riots from 1969 New York Daily News:
    http://www.yak.net/ian/stonewall.html
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by ichabodius View Post
    Heres an interesting precursor to Stonewall.
    The Comptons Cafeteria Riot, 1966:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compton%27s_Cafeteria_Riot

    Wow! I never knew about that before. Thank you for posting the link.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    toronto, canada ( Etobicoke)
    Posts
    4,680
    NYPD Commissioner Apologizes For 'Oppressive' 1969 Raid On Stonewall Inn

    https://www.npr.org/2019/06/06/73044...-stonewall-inn

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •