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Thread: Death Hag Books

  1. #901
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    I have the Kindle app for my phone. It's one of four ebook readers that I use. I love the fact that I am not stuck with just one, since no ebook reader has all the books I want. Barnes & Noble is releasing free ebooks for it's Nook reader. I have their Nook app, and now I have Jane Eyre and my favourite Jane Austen novels.

  2. #902
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    my favorites are Michael Largo's books. Final Exits, The Portable Obituary, and Genius and Heroin. Can't wait to read his latest; "God's Lunatics"...


    From my rotting body, flowers shall grow and I am in them and that is eternity. ~Edvard Munch

  3. #903
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrueBlueAngel View Post
    Im reading 'Bronson'. Its about Charles Bronson, UK's most violent criminal. Really good read.
    ooh, i want to read this! the film was awesome!


    From my rotting body, flowers shall grow and I am in them and that is eternity. ~Edvard Munch

  4. #904
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    Quote Originally Posted by Littleroben View Post
    I'm picking them up cheap where I can and as a result am reading them out of order (my own fault for being tight!! ). But I love that in this one Tuesday is in the book with the Nursery Crimes team. Have read Shades of Grey too, which I think I need to re-read at some point. If you're interested and haven't seen it, have a look at his website - it's very entertaining and I think a lot of efforts been put in
    I've been taking them out of the library, so I'm even cheaper than you are! I haven't checked out his website in ages; I'd forgotten about it- thank you!

    I'm also a Kindle owner, duchessmary. I love mine. I got mine as a Christmas gift from the hubby and my sisters-in-law and now I can't do without it. My last vacation I brought 8 books- all stashed on my slim little Kindle, which I carried on the plane in my purse. I love that you can flip between several books (I'm guilty of often reading four or five at a time), and it always goes back to the last page you left off with in each book.

    It's not as good as an iPad, TrueBlueAngel, in that it's just an eReader, and the iPad is like an iPhone/browser and an eReader in one! The Kindle (and the Nook) don't have the glare/resolution eye stress of something like an iPad because it's basically magnetic ink and looks just like a book page. It's much easier on my eyes (which are old) and I feel like I'm reading a book rather than a computer screen.

  5. #905
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    Cool! I appreciate the feedback, still thinking about a Kindle!!!
    Everyone must die but not everyone has lived


  6. #906
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  7. #907
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morty View Post
    Kenneth McKenzie of Men of Mortuaries popularity has written a book: Mortuary Confidential : Undertakers Spill the Dirt. My hair stylist lady gave me the book, so I hope it's good. He was at a local shopping center mother's day weekend signing the book, but I was working Recently with one of my mortuaries I had to go around to the other local competing mortuaries to get their prices lists. I went to his and got the price list directly from him! It's funny working with the guys I do, they've all been hit on one way or another by Mr. McKenzie. No wonder I didn't get a call from him when I applied for a job there

    I'll let y'all know how the book is
    I had to come back and let y'all know this book is AMAZING!!! I started to write a book similar to this one when I started in the biz ten years ago. It is a beautiful book, with anecdotes from funeral directors across the US. Some tales funny, some tear jerkers, and all poignent reminders of why we do what we do. I highly recommend it, for those of us in the biz and not in the biz. It helps give a fresh perspective to us funeral directors, as well as lets the 'layperson' in on what is a very different but rewarding job. I am definitely going to keep my ears pricked for when the next installment is being put together, I have a few anecdotes of my own that I'd love to share

  8. #908
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    Quote Originally Posted by duchessmary View Post
    A bit off-topic, but do any of you have a Kindle? I'm thinking about getting one, although my daughter is pestering me to get an IPad.

    Got one! I would give up my house, my husband, my money and my job before I would my Kindle. BEST money I've ever spent! And I got it when they were like $400.00. I think you can get them for about $189 now.

    Jack (O' Lantern) and I got ours on the same day. We have both loved them ever since!
    Last edited by SheBoss; 08-23-2010 at 11:19 AM.
    For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 8:38-39

  9. #909
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    I just ordered me a Kindle!!! It can't get here soon enough.
    Everyone must die but not everyone has lived


  10. #910
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    You're gonna looooove it!! I'm jealous because I bet you're getting one of the new and improved ones!
    For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 8:38-39

  11. #911
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    I did...only because Amazon doesn't have any of the Kindles in stock until September 17. So I ordered it on Ebay.
    Everyone must die but not everyone has lived


  12. #912
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    Hi everyone!
    Not sure if this book has been mentioned (it's more of a picture book) but Death Scenes: A Homicide Detective's Scrapbook has AMAZING crime scene and morgue pictures from the 1930's and 40's! I picked it up at a store in LA called Necromance, but I'm sure it is available online

  13. #913
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    Hope these havn't been mentioned before.

    The Lost Boy by Duncan Staff is a really good read about the Moors Murders and Myra Hindley.

    Not a Death Hag book but still a really good read is A Diary Of An Ordinary Woman by Margaret Forster.

    For fiction Mo Hayder is really good. I also like Jeffrey Deaver, Michael Connolly, Val McDermid and good old Agatha Christie.

  14. #914
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    I just finished "Still Missing"by Chevy Stevens. It's about the abduction, torture and escape of a young woman who was held captive for a year. It's told in flashback, skipping back and forth between her captivity and her trying to get her life back together afterward.

    I read it in a couple of days & loved how creepy it was.

  15. #915
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    I am reading, "Unbroken, A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption" by Laura Hillenbrand. I cannot recommend this book highly enough. The capacity of a human being to stay alive is unfathomable to me. These guys survived a plane crash and 46 days alive on a raft in the Pacific Ocean (eating albatross they caught with their bare hands and beating off the sharks with boat oars) only to drift 2,000 miles to a Japanese warship and be imprisoned on an island unknown to the Allies (and therefore not subject to the rules of POW treatment) - they lived to tell the story. It is literally awe-inspiring. I don't know that I've ever been so moved by a book.

  16. #916
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    Morbid Curiosity: The Disturbing Demises of the Famous and Infamous by Alan W Petrucelli - really good little death book with some interesting tidbits about a few celebs that I never knew about.

    Death Becomes Them: Unearthing the suicides of the Brilliant, the famous and the Notorious by Alix Strauss - I'm half-way thru this one, and also really good which details the suicides and what lead up to them. The author also describes the methods of suicides and how it effected them when they died. Lots of famous well-knowns in this one!

  17. #917
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvezz View Post
    I am reading, "Unbroken, A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption" by Laura Hillenbrand. I cannot recommend this book highly enough. The capacity of a human being to stay alive is unfathomable to me. These guys survived a plane crash and 46 days alive on a raft in the Pacific Ocean (eating albatross they caught with their bare hands and beating off the sharks with boat oars) only to drift 2,000 miles to a Japanese warship and be imprisoned on an island unknown to the Allies (and therefore not subject to the rules of POW treatment) - they lived to tell the story. It is literally awe-inspiring. I don't know that I've ever been so moved by a book.
    I read part of their story in a magazine recently - pretty good stuff.

  18. #918
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aries65 View Post
    Morbid Curiosity: The Disturbing Demises of the Famous and Infamous by Alan W Petrucelli - really good little death book with some interesting tidbits about a few celebs that I never knew about.

    Death Becomes Them: Unearthing the suicides of the Brilliant, the famous and the Notorious by Alix Strauss - I'm half-way thru this one, and also really good which details the suicides and what lead up to them. The author also describes the methods of suicides and how it effected them when they died. Lots of famous well-knowns in this one!

    These will be next on my download list; thanks! Right up my alley!

  19. #919
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    I have not read this thread at all yet but, off the top of my head I can think of three so I may add more later.
    Anything by Anne Rule.
    John Douglas (Is that his first name?)
    Steve Hodel (if into the Black dahlia)
    The Crime Library
    The Charley Project for Missing persons
    The Doe Network
    Copote

  20. #920
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    trying to remember the name of a book written by a survivor of a horrible attack. She lived in, I want to say Australia, and was attacked by 2 men on a beach. They brutally raped her and slit her throat so bad her head was literally hanging back almost off her shoulders. She thought she was blind but, she was looking at the night sky. She managed to crawl to the road and a bystander stopped and got her held and she lived and wrote a book. It was WAY worse than that but, i can't think of everything. Her story is in the crimelibrary. If I think of her name I will post it for you guys.

  21. #921
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    whomever wrote Precious Victims is another good one. That took place in Brighton, Il & Alton, IL and is about Paula Sims. My mom went to High School with her. I lived in Brighton for a short time and remember when the second child went missing. My mom was a basket case and we were not let out of the house even tho they were infants. Not long ago she tried to get a retrial saying she had post partum psychosis after the lady in TX killed her kids. I think it was denied. Her husband was never charged although he was more than a couple quarters short of a dollar bill.

  22. #922
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    I remember reading about Paula Sims and her dipshit husband. There is also a movie on Lifetime about the case. I hope she never gets out. Has your Mom ever mentioned what she was like in high school? I just wondered if she was always a weirdo. She has a living son. I wonder what his opinion of her is?

  23. #923
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    The Kindle baffles me-I love the heft and feel of a book, and am always going back and forth to refer back to different things, especially in the case of mysteries and true crime.

    Here are a few books I've enjoyed:

    Where Hope Begins by Alysia Sofios & By Their Father's Hand by Monte Francis. Both are about Marcus Wesson, a spooky child-molesting vampire cultist, who murdered 9 of his children (several of whom he's fathered with his older daughters) during a standoff with the Fresno police in 2004. Sofios was a reporter in Fresno, and became very close with several of the surviving family members. Francis' book is more of a 'traditional" true crime book. I found the different perspectives very interesting.

    Not Lost Forever-My Story of Survival by Carmen Salcido. Salcido was 3 years old when her father cut her throat and left her for dead in the county dump, along with the bodies of her 2 & 4 year old sisters. Daddy dearest also killed Carmen's mother, grandmother, 2 aunts, and another man he wrongly suspected of having an affair with his wife. Carmen writes about being adopted by a Catholic exteremist family, being renamed, and her struggle to understand who she is and reunite with her remaining family members, including her father, who is currently on California's death row. And is still a narcissistic douchebag.

    A Beautiful Child by Matt Birkbeck tells the story of Sharon Marshall. It opens with the battered, comatose, body of a young woman found in Oklahoma City, OK, in 1990. She died without telling anyone what had happened to her, leaving behind a husband and son. Only, her husband was actually her father...or was he? And Sharon Marshall wasn't her real name. Many people worked tirelessly for years to try to find out who Sharon really was, and you'll have to read the book to know more!

    Blind Eye by James B Stewart is about Dr. Michael Swango, a doctor that liked to kill people and poison coworkers. He moved around a lot, working in several states in the US and finally a missionary hospital in Zimbabwe. Dr. Swango aroused suspicion in others from the time he was in medical school, but between the inability to prove anything in some cases, and the desire of hospital administrators to sweep nasty things under the rug, and not checking references, he was able to continue "practicing" for years.

    Finally, Messages-Signs, Visits, and Premonitions from Loved Ones Lost on 9/11 by Bonnie McEneaney. I was just shattered by this one. I didn't remember until I read this book that an acquaintance lost a family member, and his photo jumped out at me. Bonnie's husband worked for Cantor Fitzgerald, and most of the in-depth accounts come from other CF widows, but there are many others that share their experiences. I am usually a fast reader, but I just couldn't take this book in quickly. It was incredibly powerful and moving to read these stories of ordinary people, having an ordinary Tuesday, when their lives were blown apart, and how their loved ones somehow let them know "I'm still here".

    On a lighter note, I have the new Dexter is Delicious (which I'm sure he will be, as always) and the new Scarpetta, Port Mortuary, waiting, as well as a few true crime books.

  24. #924
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    Wow, MM, they ALL sound like books I would like - thanks for the post!

  25. #925
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    Mother's Day - Dennis McDougal

    A MODERN MURDEROUS MEDEA...
    In June of l985, while her teenage sons held their half-sister down, Theresa Cross beat her 19-year-old daughter Sheila unconscious and then stuffed her into a 2' X 2' storage locker. After three days, the knocking, kicking, and cries stopped. Theresa and her sons dumped the girl's body in the desolate High Sierras....

    The summer before, Theresa had dug a bullet out of her daughter Suesan's chest with a paring knife. When Suesan failed to recover (without benefit of doctors or hospital), Theresa and her two sons drove the delirious girl to the mountains , doused her with gasoline, and set her on fire....

    For nearly nine years, Theresa Cross Knorr got away with murder, until her youngest daughter, Terry Knorr Graves, finally found a cop who believed the incredible story of her two murdered sisters.

    That story is all here, the shocking life of a woman whose violence, jealousy, rage, and domination led to a brutally heinous crime of ruthless ferocity.
    “I’ve been very fortunate to play this long, been a part of a lot of good organizations, played with a lot of great players, so, it means a lot to me.” ~ Paul Martin on playing his 800th NHL game, December 2, 2016.

  26. #926
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    Quote Originally Posted by PurrPurr View Post
    Mother's Day - Dennis McDougal

    A MODERN MURDEROUS MEDEA...
    In June of l985, while her teenage sons held their half-sister down, Theresa Cross beat her 19-year-old daughter Sheila unconscious and then stuffed her into a 2' X 2' storage locker. After three days, the knocking, kicking, and cries stopped. Theresa and her sons dumped the girl's body in the desolate High Sierras....

    The summer before, Theresa had dug a bullet out of her daughter Suesan's chest with a paring knife. When Suesan failed to recover (without benefit of doctors or hospital), Theresa and her two sons drove the delirious girl to the mountains , doused her with gasoline, and set her on fire....

    For nearly nine years, Theresa Cross Knorr got away with murder, until her youngest daughter, Terry Knorr Graves, finally found a cop who believed the incredible story of her two murdered sisters.

    That story is all here, the shocking life of a woman whose violence, jealousy, rage, and domination led to a brutally heinous crime of ruthless ferocity.

    There's a thread here about her, I think. I don't remember if that was the same book I read about her, but honestly I don't think I was ever so disturbed by a true crime book than I was about her story. Her youngest daughter, Terry (I think she's the one who ultimately blew the whistle on her mom and brothers) passed away at 30-something of, I think, a heart attack.

  27. #927
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    some death related books I recd for Xmas:

    On The Farm by Stevie Cameron - covers Canada'a most prolific serial killer Robert Pickton and the RCMP's incompetence.

    The Kennedy Detail by Gerald Blaine - the Kennedy assassination from the point of view of JFK's Secret Service detail.

    The Killer of Little Shepherds by Douglas Starr - a great book on the father of forensic science Dr Alexandre Lacassagne.

    The Emperor of all Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Dr Siddhartha Mukherjee.

    Life by Keith Richards - Richards is not dead but he should be.

  28. #928
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    Of course Helter Skelter is a must read but I also read a book called "Vanished at Sea". It tells the story of the Hawkes murders by Skylar Deleon. If you have any interest in the case you will find fairly limited info on the internet. This book will fill in all of the blanks. A haunting tale.

  29. #929
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    I quite enjoyed 'The Devil in the White City', about both the 1892 Chicago World's Fair, and the serial killer HH Holmes.

  30. #930
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    I am reading, "Stiff: The Curious Life of Human Cadavers" by Mary Roach. I love it! It is so interesting; so far she's discussed dissection of corpses for anatomy classes (and how folks used to grave-rob to get bodies for this purpose), using cadavers in crash-test research, and a body farm. She has such a great sense of humor, too, amidst all the death talk. I highly recommend it!

  31. #931
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    I just ordered "Autobiography of an Execution" by David R. Dow. The book follows a Texas lawyer who handles death penalty cases. Nominated for the National Book Critics Award in non-fiction.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0446562076/ref=ord_cart_shr?ie=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER

  32. #932
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvezz View Post
    I am reading, "Stiff: The Curious Life of Human Cadavers" by Mary Roach. I love it! It is so interesting; so far she's discussed dissection of corpses for anatomy classes (and how folks used to grave-rob to get bodies for this purpose), using cadavers in crash-test research, and a body farm. She has such a great sense of humor, too, amidst all the death talk. I highly recommend it!
    Its on my backburner. Got it for a buck on clearance at halfprice books. It fits in to my reading habits - its basically a selections of articles; its non-linear so I can read a chapter and forget about til I need something to read while taking a shit and grab it in haste. Like the crash test cadaver and plastic surgery cadaver head chapters. Like I said its mostly a bathroom reader, not too captivating. Im rotating this, World War Z, a rereading of Rip It Up and Start Again, a rereading of a Vice magazine that features the Kuchar Brothers where they mention my friends mom Donna Kerness, and Joseph Campbells The Masks Of God during shits.
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

  33. #933
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    Quote Originally Posted by pvezz View Post
    I am reading, "Stiff: The Curious Life of Human Cadavers" by Mary Roach. I love it! It is so interesting; so far she's discussed dissection of corpses for anatomy classes (and how folks used to grave-rob to get bodies for this purpose), using cadavers in crash-test research, and a body farm. She has such a great sense of humor, too, amidst all the death talk. I highly recommend it!
    I really liked it. Got some looks as I was carting it around though.

    You don't mess with friggin Dave Coulier click here to mess

  34. #934
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    Borders to file for bankruptcy. I love bookstores. I know they can't compete with Amazon but its still sad.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704329104576138353865644420.html
    Last edited by cash; 02-12-2011 at 05:43 PM.

  35. #935
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    Quote Originally Posted by orionova View Post
    I quite enjoyed 'The Devil in the White City', about both the 1892 Chicago World's Fair, and the serial killer HH Holmes.

    I think this is the next one I'll read.

  36. #936
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    Borders Filed Chapter 11

    I worked for Satan, sorry Borders. So this has made me positively
    GLEEFUL!!!

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...340434998.html
    Lou: You know what? You've got spunk.Mary: Well, yes…Lou: I hate spunk.

  37. #937
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    Another bookstore hits the dust,eh?Like Music shops..
    Kindle rules.Not.
    Oh the smell of records and books.The artwork withought needing a magnifying glass.The lyric sheets.The art of having to get off your ass and turn the record over.
    This the Modern World!

  38. #938
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    in a way thats sad i like borders way better then barnes and noble and booksamillion

    Mommies little clones. Est since 2004!

  39. #939
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    Add it to the list of things that didnt get a bailout during the great collapse . Circuit City, Mervyns, the company I got laid off from .... and me

  40. #940
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    I'm not surprised. This has been expected for a while now.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v216/FujikoMine/Fujikos Pics/fujikogun.gif



  41. #941
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    For some reason I thought it was Barnes & Noble was the bookstore having problems, not Borders. Kinda bummed to see it go, though I wonder what will become of the giant two-level one at the mall. Maybe they'll bring back the JCPenney it replaced. :P

  42. #942
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeny994 View Post
    I worked for Satan, sorry Borders. So this has made me positively
    GLEEFUL!!!

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...340434998.html

    Satan sells books?

  43. #943
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    Sorry lenny, I didnt mean to sound so cold like that. For what its worth I did buy my last book there " Liberty and Tyranny " by Mark Levin

  44. #944
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    I am sorry to see this happen. Borders had much better customer service than Barnes and Noble.
    Wanna see my grandkids?

  45. #945
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    85% of the time, I seem to find more books I want from Borders. Then again, my books are not really that easy to come across in the first place.
    Didn't know that was a thing...

  46. #946
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    I have always had fantastic customer service from Borders and always stop in at a Borders when I travel. Never cared for Barnes & Noble except for the one in Flagstaff, Arizona. I will miss the Borders that are closing. (I also miss the 80's into 90's Mervyns, they went down hill and stopped selling quality stuff about the time they got rid of the "Open! Open!" lady.)

  47. #947
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    I really, really hope they won't be closing the Borders here! It's literally the ONLY book store in my area! I think people from Canton consider reading a disease. That is one thing I miss about living in the Chicago area. If there was a book I wanted, I had no problem finding it anywhere.
    "For mine is a generation that circles the globe in search of something we haven't tried before. So never refuse an invitation, never resist the unfamiliar, never fail to be polite, and never outstay your welcome. Just keep your mind open and suck in the experience, and if it hurts, you know what? It was probably worth it." ~The Beach~



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  48. #948
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    Most of you know I live in the middle of Deliverance, Mississippi and we've never had a Borders. But our only 2 used book stores both closed last month. The only thing left is the BooksaMillion and Barnes and Noble. I think B and N will weather this storm nicely as they are also the college bookstore of most of the colleges now. That was actually good thinking on their part to diversify like that.

    I kindle and my mom just bought one.
    For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord. Romans 8:38-39

  49. #949
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    My hubs let slip last night that he's buying me a Kindle and I'm elated!
    "For mine is a generation that circles the globe in search of something we haven't tried before. So never refuse an invitation, never resist the unfamiliar, never fail to be polite, and never outstay your welcome. Just keep your mind open and suck in the experience, and if it hurts, you know what? It was probably worth it." ~The Beach~



    www.minlynn.deviantart.com

  50. #950
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forever-27 View Post
    Sorry lenny, I didnt mean to sound so cold like that. For what its worth I did buy my last book there " Liberty and Tyranny " by Mark Levin

    No no no. you didn't

    I loved selling books. I hated the way we as employees were treated by Borders. For example as a manager I was making below, i said, BELOW the poverty line. Thus, I qualified for Food Stamps. Borders saw this as loyalty to the company not as their piss poor way of treating/paying valued employees.
    Lou: You know what? You've got spunk.Mary: Well, yes…Lou: I hate spunk.

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